Cover image for Encyclopedia of weather and climate
Title:
Encyclopedia of weather and climate
Author:
Allaby, Michael.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Facts on File, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
2 volumes pages : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. A-L -- v. 2. M-Z.
ISBN:
9780816040711

9780816048014

9780816048021
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QC854 .A45 2002 V.2 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Central Library QC854 .A45 2002 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

This work presents 4000 entries in an A to Z format. Topics include: the processes that produce our weather; the circulation of the atmosphere that produces the world's climates; classification of climates; and important scientific concepts used by climatologists and meteorologists; the history of ideas underlying the atmospheric sciences; biographical accounts of those who have made significant contributions to climatology and meteorology; and particular weather events, from extreme tropical cyclones and tornadoes to local winds. Each entry features numerous cross references and definitions of weather- and climate-related terms as well as additional sources for further study. Appendices listing historical examples of disasters caused by bad weather, milestones in the development of the atmospheric sciences, and the geological time scale aim to round out this comprehensive survey.


Author Notes

Michael Allaby resides in Tighnabruaich, Scotland.


Reviews 4

Choice Review

Interest in weather and climate in the last decade has created a new market for specialized encyclopedias on the subject. The latest of these is Allaby's, which tries to provide comprehensive coverage to this topic while making it accessible to a large audience. Over 3,000 entries cover broadly all areas of meteorology and climatology. It most closely resembles Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather, ed. by Stephen H. Schneider et al. (CH, Oct'96). Allaby's work is slightly less expensive and contains many more entries than Schneider's, but Allaby's definitions are shorter and less comprehensive in scope. Another major difference is that Schneider supplements many entries with additional reference resources while Allaby simply offers a brief general bibliography. Schneider is more scholarly in tone, but Allaby's, due to its greater number of citations, shorter explanations, and lower cost, will probably be more helpful to lower-division undergraduates and nonscientists. Recommended for all libraries. J. C. Stachacz Dickinson College


Booklist Review

The biggest change between the first edition (2001) of the Encyclopedia of Weather and Climate and this new revised edition is that a good deal of the material has been reorganized into several appendixes. The number of A-Z entries has dropped from 3,000 to approximately 1,400 articles of greater length and depth. One of the appendixes contains biographical entries on more than 100 people noted in weather and climate history; these were part of the main A-Z section in the previous edition. Other types of entries that have moved into the appendixes include those covering individual tropical cyclones and storms, tornadoes, laws and international agreements, and ocean currents. The organization of the revised edition makes use of the extensive indexing and cross-references so it is simple to locate terms in the context of ideas or themes rather than as individual articles. Many different types of winds, such as the Santa Ana, sirocco, and zonda, had individual entries in the first edition but in the revised edition are part of one longer entry, Local winds. New graphs, charts, and diagrams add to the depth of the modified and rewritten articles. Many citations have been updated at the end of articles to reflect more recent material for further reading. The bibliography is much more extensive and includes a large number of Web sites for the reader to consult for further information. The chronologies of weather disasters and discoveries have been updated. Libraries that did not purchase the first edition would be advised to consider this title for its easy-to-understand, thorough explanations of weather phenomena. Libraries owning the first edition should consider updating their collections.--Stratton, Steve Copyright 2007 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Since the 2005 publication of its first edition, this important book has been extensively restructured to include relevant research, media coverage, and public interest in the atmospheric sciences owing to significant events and changes in our climate worldwide. More than 1400 cross-referenced entries feature an impressive array of materials, including 350-plus black-and-white maps, charts, illustrations, and photographs. Noted author Allaby, a member of the New York Academy of Sciences, discusses such subjects as cloud formation, atmospheric phenomena, techniques and instruments used to study the atmosphere, important scientific concepts in climatology and meteorology, the history of ideas underlying atmospheric sciences, and particular weather events. He also gives wide coverage to important elements, including air pollution, the carbon cycle, climate types, the greenhouse effect, local wind, precipitation, satellite instruments, temperature, tornado, urban climate, and wind systems. Ten helpful appendixes contain more than 100 biographical portraits of notable scientists in the field of weather and climate; list cyclones, tropical storms, and tornadoes; address ocean currents and weather-related disasters; and offer a chronology of discoveries in climatology and meteorology. BOTTOM LINE An important resource that will be a welcome addition to public libraries. Libraries owning the first edition would benefit from the update.-Kathleen A. Welton, Chicago (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-A much-needed resource that does not disappoint. Nearly 3000 alphabetically arranged entries offer explanations of how the atmosphere works, how weather forms, instruments, important contributors to the advancement of the atmospheric sciences, and more. Allaby's entries range from a few words to essays of several paragraphs. The articles are written in a readable style that requires no background knowledge, though a pronunciation guide is lacking. The set is profusely illustrated with black-and-white maps, diagrams, drawings, and photographs-all captioned. Tables and graphs are scattered throughout. Bold entry headings and guide words at the top of each page facilitate access, while generous type size aids readability. There are a number of cross- and see-references. Many articles include Web addresses; an appendix rounds them all up. A bibliography of books and articles, chronologies of disasters and discovery, a geological time scale, and a listing of tornadoes of the past are also included. There is a comprehensive index in both volumes. This set will be a useful source for all those weather-related questions, for report material, and for general interest.-Dana McDougald, Cedar Shoals High School, Athens, GA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

From the Introduction: The weather we experience today is different from that of the Little Ice Age of the 17th century and of the Middle Ages...Today, though, there are fears that the climate may be changing faster than it has done for thousands of years and that the gases we release into the air, from our cars, factories, domestic fires, power stations, farming, and forest clearance may be accelerating that change...If we are to make informed decisions about climate change and the possibility that our activities may be partly responsible for it, we need to know something of the way the atmosphere works, of how our weather is produced.--Michael Allaby For most of history, humans have made every possible effort to accurately foretell the weather, evolving from the use of guesswork, rule of thumb, and signs in the sky to the development of contemporary forecasting techniques drawn from two scientific disciplines, climatology and meteorology. Encyclopedia of Weather and Climate summarizes this knowledge and presents it in a two-volume A-to-Z compendium of nearly 4,000 entries that cover: The processes that produce our weather The circulation of the atmosphere that produces the world's climates Classification of climates Important scientific concepts used by climatologists and meteorologists The history of ideas underlying the atmospheric sciences Biographical accounts of those who have made significant contributions to climatology and meteorology Particular weather events, from extreme tropical cyclones and tornadoes to local winds. Each entry features numerous cross references and definitions of weather- and climate-related terms as well as additional sources for further study. Nearly 300 photographs, maps, and charts offer highly evocative depictions of various weather and climate conditions. Appendixes listing historical examples of disasters caused by bad weather, milestones in the development of the atmospheric sciences, and the geological time scale round out this comprehensive survey. Entries include: Air mass analysis Bath plug vortex Cloud classification Deforestation El NiÂ--o Daniel Fahrenheit Gaia hypothesis Hot lightning Intertropical front Jet streams Kuroshio Current Lake-breeze front Marine forecast Nimbus satellites Oasis effect Peak gust Quasi-stationary front Radar wind Subpolar region Temperate belt Urban canyon layer Variable gas Weather stations Xerothermic Young ice Zonal circulation. Excerpted from Encyclopedia of Weather and Climate by Michael Allaby All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Introductionp. vii
List of Entriesp. 1
Bibliography and Further Readingp. 651
Appendixesp. 655
I. Chronology of Disastersp. 655
II. Chronology of Discoveryp. 659
III. The Geological Time Scalep. 663
IV. Tornadoes of the Pastp. 665
V. Websitesp. 669
Indexp. 11

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