Cover image for The Macmillan encyclopedia of weather
Title:
The Macmillan encyclopedia of weather
Author:
Stein, Paul, 1968-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Macmillan Reference USA, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
295 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 29 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780028654737
Format :
Book

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QC854 .S74 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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QC854 .S74 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

The "Macmillan Encyclopedia of Weather is a single-volume, A-Z introduction to the basics of weather phenomena for students and general researchers. Approximately 150 entries provide comprehensive coverage of weather in all its manifestations, covering terms, concepts and particular phenomena. Featuring 150 full-color photographs and illustrations, this volume supports science and environmental studies curricula.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Edited by the senior meteorologist at the Weather Channel, this title is designed to acquaint readers in grades six through the adult level with important concepts in the field of meteorology. From Acid rain to Zonal flow, 150 entries are arranged alphabetically and vary in length from two or three paragraphs to almost 10 pages for Hurricanes and Tornadoes. Most entries are devoted to meteorological terms (Alberta Clipper, Hygrometer, Wind chill), but a handful of individuals, such as Theodore Fujita (he developed the Fujita scale for classifying tornadoes, although his entry neglects to mention this), are also included. The text is readable and does not overwhelm the reader with technical jargon. Each entry concludes with cross-references to other appropriate entries. The illustrations are superior. The photographs are often dramatic, capturing weather phenomenon such as lightning strikes or cloud formations. Charts and satellite images help demonstrate points in the entries. Reference aids include a glossary with very brief definitions of terms, a bibliography of books published within the last five years, recent periodicals and Web sites, and an index. The index indicates main entries in bold type but does not list illustrations or charts. This book will be useful for student reports as well as for browsing. UXL's The Complete Weather Source (1997) covers some of the same topics in more depth, using a textbook rather than a dictionary approach; and Grolier's colorful 12-volume Weather Watch (2000) examines the topic month-by-month; both are aimed at a slightly younger audience. The Macmillan volume is recommended for school and public libraries needing an accessible reference source on the topic.