Cover image for Easy reading writing : easy reading about writing easy reading
Title:
Easy reading writing : easy reading about writing easy reading
Author:
Abresch, Peter E.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Houston : Scrivenery Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
293 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781893818057
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN3355 .A27 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

If we're trying to teach easy-reading writing, shouldn't our instruction books be easy to read? That's the approach taken by Peter Abresch. EASY READING WRITING is three decades of experience coupled with contemporary advice...all conversationally relayed by a wise, longtime friend.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Novelist Abresch (Bloody Bonsai), who has been writing fiction for 30 years, believes that all written texts, whether fiction or nonfiction, should be easy reading. In his own book on writing, he dismisses most writing manuals as being too hard to read, presumably referring to William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White's The Elements of Style and Kate L. Turabian's Manual for Writers, often criticized for their density. Assuming no knowledge of the writing process or the publishing industry, Abresch discusses how new or minimally published novelists get published, usually with small presses, and wisely counsels writers to get reviewed wherever and whenever possible. He also recommends hiring a copy editor citing his own experience and advocates conventions for networking. In general, Abresch's writing is laden with chatty, sometimes self-indulgent humor and some possibly disingenuous remarks which makes for easy reading if you share his sense of humor. Otherwise, it encourages skimming. All things considered, this should not be your library's only title on this topic. Robert Moore, Framingham, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

1 Motivationp. 7
2 Welcome Aboardp. 11
3 Getting Startedp. 17
Caveatp. 17
Create on a Computerp. 18
What Should We Write About?p. 20
The Ideap. 21
Building the Storyp. 23
Keep a Journalp. 23
Easy Readingp. 24
Disciplinep. 25
4 Preliminariesp. 27
Outlinesp. 28
Storyboardsp. 29
Brainstormingp. 30
Free Associationp. 31
Beware of Naysayersp. 32
Beware of Me as a Naysayerp. 33
5 Getting It Downp. 35
First Draftsp. 35
Keeping Notesp. 37
Stick with Itp. 38
6 The First Leg of the Tripodp. 41
Plotp. 41
Plot-line Mountainp. 44
The Finalep. 47
Fast Fadep. 48
Plot Pointsp. 48
Blocking the Storyp. 49
7 Hey, Who Are You?p. 53
Characterizationp. 53
Character Historyp. 55
Building the Characterp. 57
8 Real Peoplep. 61
Character Profilesp. 61
Keep It Aroundp. 70
Marrying Character to Plotp. 71
9 Effective Writingp. 75
Spending Wordsp. 75
Cutting Out the Curlicuesp. 79
10 Writing Effective Sentences and Paragraphsp. 81
Active Sentencesp. 81
Speedp. 84
Paragraph Flowp. 85
Black Words on White Paperp. 89
11 Writing Effective Chaptersp. 93
From Chapter to Chapterp. 93
Reading Aloudp. 96
Voicep. 97
Hard Copyp. 98
12 Effective Writing Concludedp. 101
Worn Out Wordsp. 101
Abresch's Order of Rewritingp. 104
Conclusionp. 105
13 Head with a Viewp. 109
POVp. 109
First and Second Person POVp. 111
Narrative POVp. 113
Omniscient POVp. 114
Internal Monologuep. 115
14 Whose Eyeballs?p. 119
Multiple POVsp. 119
POV Shiftsp. 120
Dangers of Multiple POVsp. 121
15 Put Them on Stagep. 125
Dramatize, Don't Informp. 125
Inform Instead of Dramatizep. 133
16 Opening Hooks--Come into My Parlor, Said the Spiderp. 137
17 Speak to Me, Babyp. 145
Dialoguep. 145
Speaker Attributesp. 147
Tags, Beats, Body Languagep. 152
Subject Shift in Dialoguep. 155
18 Look Who's Talkingp. 159
Dialogue in Group Scenesp. 159
Dialogue Under Stressp. 163
Dialectp. 165
Character-Specific Dialoguep. 169
Tracking a Character's Dialoguep. 172
19 Where Are We?p. 173
20 Everything Has a Time and Locationp. 185
Locusp. 185
Settingp. 187
Timep. 189
21 Biff, Bam, Bangp. 191
Clarityp. 192
Writing Actionp. 192
22 Foretellingp. 199
23 Credibilityp. 205
Story Logicp. 205
Researchp. 209
24 No Rest for the Wearyp. 211
Tensionp. 211
Conflictp. 213
25 Nail Bitingp. 219
Suspensep. 219
Ticking Clockp. 220
Stretching Timep. 221
Skew the Normalp. 223
The Unknownp. 226
26 The Backs, Story and Flashp. 231
Back-Storyp. 231
Flashbacksp. 234
27 Tell Me What You Thinkp. 239
Critiquesp. 239
Writer's Workshopsp. 240
Classesp. 241
Freelance Editorsp. 242
28 Bewarep. 247
Warningsp. 247
Scamsp. 247
Vanity Pressesp. 249
Up-Front Moneyp. 250
Self-Publishingp. 250
Writing Magazinesp. 251
Conferences and Symposiumsp. 252
29 After the Last Draftp. 255
Manuscript Mechanicsp. 255
Formatp. 258
30 Where Do We Send Itp. 263
Agentsp. 263
Agent Chargesp. 265
Finding an Agentp. 265
Query Lettersp. 267
Small Pressesp. 273
Rejectionsp. 274
31 Virtual and On-Demand Booksp. 277
E-Publishingp. 277
Print-on-Demandp. 280
32 Hurrahp. 283
Acceptancep. 283
Editorial Reviewp. 284
Publicityp. 285
33 This Is It--There Ain't No Morep. 289

Google Preview