Cover image for The politics of breast cancer
Title:
The politics of breast cancer
Author:
Casamayou, Maureen Hogan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : Georgetown University Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
xvi, 191 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Ch. 1. The breast cancer problem: personal and public health -- Ch. 2. Political and governmental responses: from the 1920s through the 1970s -- Ch. 3. Policy entrepreneurs: research advocacy (1975-1990) -- Ch. 4. The emergence of organized breast cancer advocacy -- Ch. 5. The mobilization of breast cancer advocacy: resources and growth (1990-1993) -- Ch. 6. The national breast cancer coalition: influencing the political institutions -- Ch. 7. Political institutions and the window of opportunity (1991-1993) -- Ch. 8. Conclusion.
ISBN:
9780878408504

9780878408511
Format :
Book

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Material Type
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Status
Central Library RC280.B8 C394 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Details the National Breast Cancer Coalition's meteoric rise and lobbying efforts, explaining how the coalition grew from the simultaneous efforts of a network of women who invested their time, energy, money and professional skills in the fight for increased funding for breast-cancer research.


Summary

Between 1990 and 1993, breast cancer activism became a significant political movement. The issue began to receive extensive media attention, and federal funding for breast cancer research jumped dramatically. Describing the origins of this surge in interest, Maureen Hogan Casamayou attributes it to the emergence of politically potent activism among breast cancer survivors and their supporters. Exploring the creation and development of the National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC), she shows how many of its key leaders were mobilized by their own traumatic experiences with the disease and its treatments.

Casamayou details the NBCC's meteoric rise and impressive lobbying efforts, explaining how--in contrast to grassroots movements founded by dedicated individuals--the coalition grew from the simultaneous efforts of a network of women who invested their time, energy, money, and professional skills in the fight for increased funding for breast cancer research. This multiple leadership--or collective entrepreneurialism, says Casamayou--was crucial to the NBCC's success framing the issue in the minds of the public and policymakers alike.


Author Notes

Maureen Hogan Casamayou is author of Bureaucracy in Crisis: Three Mile Island, the Shuttle Challenger, and Risk Assessment.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

A potentially useful review of policy history, research initiatives, and public awareness about breast cancer, Casamayou's book is truncated in time, curiously, at the early years of the Clinton presidency. The stimulus for the book is in the preface; this is in part a personal account. There are nine sections (including the introduction) and a conclusion. Health policy discussion and decision making works best when firmly grounded in biomedical reality. Chapter 1, "The Breast Cancer Problem," is not well grounded. The 46 citations are mostly secondary and interpretative sources, none newer than 1995. Missing entirely are topical review citations, e.g., Burstein and Winer's October 12, 2000, article in New England Journal of Medicine, which underscores the lack of progress despite all of the effort and research money. The personal account describes the problems of postsurgical lymphedema of the arm in an effective way; this is a minor part of the message. Best developed is the shocking failure of research programs to make effective use of women subjects in diseases of women, a fault yet extant. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. D. R. Shanklin University of Chicago


Choice Review

A potentially useful review of policy history, research initiatives, and public awareness about breast cancer, Casamayou's book is truncated in time, curiously, at the early years of the Clinton presidency. The stimulus for the book is in the preface; this is in part a personal account. There are nine sections (including the introduction) and a conclusion. Health policy discussion and decision making works best when firmly grounded in biomedical reality. Chapter 1, "The Breast Cancer Problem," is not well grounded. The 46 citations are mostly secondary and interpretative sources, none newer than 1995. Missing entirely are topical review citations, e.g., Burstein and Winer's October 12, 2000, article in New England Journal of Medicine, which underscores the lack of progress despite all of the effort and research money. The personal account describes the problems of postsurgical lymphedema of the arm in an effective way; this is a minor part of the message. Best developed is the shocking failure of research programs to make effective use of women subjects in diseases of women, a fault yet extant. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. D. R. Shanklin University of Chicago


Table of Contents

Dedicationp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
Chapter 1 The Breast Cancer Problem: Personal and Public Healthp. 13
Chapter 2 Political and Governmental Responses: From the 1920s Through the 1970sp. 25
Chapter 3 Policy Entrepreneurs: Research Advocacy (1975-1990)p. 45
Chapter 4 The Emergence of Organized Breast Cancer Advocacyp. 63
Chapter 5 The Mobilization of Breast Cancer Advocacy: Resources and Growth (1990-1993)p. 81
Chapter 6 The National Breast Cancer Coalition: Influencing the Political Institutionsp. 103
Chapter 7 Political Institutions and the Window of Opportunity (1991-1993)p. 129
Chapter 8 Conclusionp. 153
Endnotesp. 165
Indexp. 187
Dedicationp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
Chapter 1 The Breast Cancer Problem: Personal and Public Healthp. 13
Chapter 2 Political and Governmental Responses: From the 1920s Through the 1970sp. 25
Chapter 3 Policy Entrepreneurs: Research Advocacy (1975-1990)p. 45
Chapter 4 The Emergence of Organized Breast Cancer Advocacyp. 63
Chapter 5 The Mobilization of Breast Cancer Advocacy: Resources and Growth (1990-1993)p. 81
Chapter 6 The National Breast Cancer Coalition: Influencing the Political Institutionsp. 103
Chapter 7 Political Institutions and the Window of Opportunity (1991-1993)p. 129
Chapter 8 Conclusionp. 153
Endnotesp. 165
Indexp. 187

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