Cover image for Full moon
Title:
Full moon
Author:
Wilcox, Brian.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Doubleday Book for Young Readers, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : illustrations ; 31 cm
Summary:
A little boy snags the moon with his fishing rod, and it flies him to New York to visit his grandmother.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
430 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.7 0.5 52566.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 34583 Guided reading level: K.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780385327923

9780385908405
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

For my birthday, Grandma sent me a crystal globe of the city where she lives. "If you look carefully, maybe you can see me," she wrote. Late that night, I woke to find a full moon glowing in a starry sky. "To Grandma's," I shouted. So begins a boy's search for his grandmother as he is transported on a magical journey through nighttime New York City. The globe/moon pulls him along to sweeping vistas. From the spiraling towers of Saint Patrick's Cathedral, to the grand lions on the steps of the public library, to the heights of the Chrysler Building and other wondrous sights, our hero encounters the city's jeweled architecture and many delightful denizens--arriving just in time for a huge celebration atop a famous green lady.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3-5. On the night of his birthday, a young boy harnesses the moon with his fishing rod and flies off to visit his faraway grandmother. The moon sweeps the young traveler past "two ladies floating and dancing over a wide avenue" and "flying cowboys [who] rope faded stars from the sky." When the boy catches sight of "the great green lady holding a torch that lit the night sky," he knows where he is. He soon reencounters the colorful characters that he met on his journey, now dancing and singing beneath the stars in a surprise celebration of his birthday. It's then that the boy receives the greatest gift of all--his grandmother greets him from atop an African elephant. The fantasy of this dreamlike adventure is magnified by exquisitely detailed charcoal illustrations. --Cynthia Turnquest


Publisher's Weekly Review

For Wilcox's first outing, a picture book done entirely in pencil, he teams with David (Beetle Boy), and the adventure unfolds on a big stage. A boy receives a magic globe from his grandmother as a birthday gift, and Wilcox visually suggests its transformation into the moon in the sky; he then asks the moon to carry him to his grandmother. He drifts through surreal landscapes in which his toys, now large as life, zip and zoom past St. Patrick's Cathedral and through Central Park, gradually revealing Grandma's home as Manhattan. A series of unanswered questions (" `You're almost there,' a man told me. `Almost where?' I asked. But the moon lifted me away before I got an answer") hint at a surprise birthday party on top of the Statue of Liberty and a reunion with Grandma. The spreads of nighttime New York teem with life tightrope artists teeter high above the streets, water towers launch off rooftops, the public library's lions yawn and stretch but, unfortunately, the details, all in shades of gray, sometimes appear muddied. The nameless narrator seems a little indistinct, too. The city itself is the real star of the story, and Wilcox successfully brings its grandeur and allure to life. All ages. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Casting his fishing line into the night sky, a boy latches onto the moon for an adventuresome ride to a magical city. A bedtime wish that he might visit his grandmother triggers the sequence of fantastical events. She has sent, as a birthday gift, "a crystal globe of the city where she lives." The boy narrates his surreal voyage, depicted in full-page drawings in shades of gray across spreads. As the boy dangles from the moon, it pauses to reveal swooping roller coasters, talking animals, enchanted ladies dancing high in the air, stone lions come to life by the library steps, flying cowboys on exotic craft, and circus performers, all indicating an impending celebration. Predictably, it turns out to be a birthday party for the boy, held near the Statue of Liberty, with Grandma present astride an African elephant. The visual scheme, with plentiful absurdities to be discovered in each panorama, conveys the plot even without the brief narrative. Framed in deep blue line, the scenes have a gothic flavor, though the drawings and use of light lack strong definition. Readers who stick with the story through the bland grayness will enjoy the fanciful details and the whimsical conclusion. David Wiesner's wordless renditions in Free Fall (Lothrop, 1988) and Sector 7 (Clarion, 1999) are similar in concept, tone, and interesting perspectives.-Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.