Cover image for The jump at the sun treasury : an African American picture book collection.
Title:
The jump at the sun treasury : an African American picture book collection.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, 2001.
Physical Description:
205 pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
These hands by Hope Lynne Price -- Can I pray with my eyes open? by Susan Taylor Brown -- Say Hey! a song of Willie Mays by Peter Mandel -- Big, spooky house by Donna Washington -- Granddaddy's street songs by Monalisa DeGross -- Alvin Ailey by Andrea Davis Pinkney -- Celebration! by Jane Resh Thomas.
ISBN:
9780786807543
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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PS509.N4 J86 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PS509.N4 J86 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS509.N4 J86 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS509.N4 J86 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Eight picture books are combined in one beautiful collection: Alvin Ailey, A Big, Spooky House, Can I Pray with My Eyes Open?, Celebration , Grandaddy's Street Songs, Say Hey A Song of Willie Mays, These Hands, and We Had a Picnic This Sunday Past.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Ages 3-8. This anthology binds together seven picture books previously published by Jump at the Sun. The range is wide--a biography of Willie Mays, a scary ghost story, a meditation about prayer--and the illustrations vary from watercolor, scratchboard, and collage to computer-generated art. The artists include lesser-knowns as well as established award winners such as Floyd Cooper (who illustrates Monalisa DeGross' Grandaddy's Street Songs), Brian Pinkney (who illustrates Andrea Davis Pinkney's Alvin Ailey), and Bryan Collier (who illustrates Hope Lynne Price's These Hands). Of course, when picture books are bound together into one heavy volume, the book jackets, endpapers, and some page designs are lost or changed. What's more, in this case, the tight book binding makes it hard to see all of the double-page-spread art. Still, for small collections and family sharing, this is an inexpensive introduction to some great storytellers. --Hazel Rochman