Cover image for Enemy in the Fort
Title:
Enemy in the Fort
Author:
Buckey, Sarah Masters, 1955-
Publication Information:
Middleton, WI : Pleasant Company Publications, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
163 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm.
Summary:
In 1754, with her own parents taken captive, twelve-year-old Rebecca must confront her fear and hatred of the Abenaki when a boy raised by members of that tribe is brought to the fort at Charleston, New Hampshire, just before a series of thefts occurs.
General Note:
"American girl."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
620 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.6 5.0 52589.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.1 8 Quiz: 26670 Guided reading level: S.
ISBN:
9781584853077

9781584853060
Format :
Book

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

In 1754, with her own parents taken captive, twelve-year-old Rebecca must confront her fear and hatred of the Abenaki when a boy raised by members of that tribe is brought to the fort at Charleston, New Hampshire, just before a series of thefts occurs.


Summary

In 1754 New Hampshire, 12-year-old Rebecca Percy is worried about her parents, who have been captured by the Abenaki Indians, and about the mysterious boy raised by the Abenaki who has come to stay at the fort with her.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-7. This entry in the History Mysteries series, set just before the outbreak of the French and Indian War, provides both a glimpse at social history and a powerful message about prejudice. In 1752, 10-year-old Rebecca Percy and her little sister watch from a hiding place as the Abenaki Indians take their parents captive. The horror leaves the sisters with a bone-deep hatred for the Indians--and two engraved spoons from England, which figure in the mystery. The girls are taken to live with the Widow Tyler in Fort Number Four in New Hampshire. Their lives (and the lives of others in the small community) are disrupted again by the arrival of a 14-year-old "white Indian" boy, captured by the Indians when he was small and now totally assimilated into Abenaki culture. When the girls' precious spoons are stolen and Indians raid the fort, the boy is suspected of both thievery and treachery. Rebecca's efforts to search out the truth put her in satisfyingly heart-stopping danger. An overview of the French and Indian War follows the story. --Connie Fletcher


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Rebecca Percy's parents and baby brother have been kidnapped by the Abenaki Indians on the dangerous 1754 New Hampshire frontier, leaving Rebecca and her sister to seek shelter at Fort Number 4 with kindly Widow Tyler. The work is hard, but Rebecca never gives up hope that her family might have been sold to the French, who often ransomed captives back to the English. She reacts with fear and disgust, however, when the woman takes in Isaac, a white boy who has been raised by the Abenakis and remains loyal to them. Shortly after his arrival, a series of thefts occur among the settlers. Of course, Isaac is the logical suspect. The plot is carefully built with interesting and well-researched historical details. The mystery is also well crafted, and children will enjoy gathering clues and trying to guess the outcome. Characterizations are strong, with believable growth. For example, Rebecca develops empathy for the Abenakis, moving from a hateful attitude toward a greater understanding of their desperate situation. The relationships between the Native people and the settlers are complex, and are responsibly and respectfully presented.-Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-7. This entry in the History Mysteries series, set just before the outbreak of the French and Indian War, provides both a glimpse at social history and a powerful message about prejudice. In 1752, 10-year-old Rebecca Percy and her little sister watch from a hiding place as the Abenaki Indians take their parents captive. The horror leaves the sisters with a bone-deep hatred for the Indians--and two engraved spoons from England, which figure in the mystery. The girls are taken to live with the Widow Tyler in Fort Number Four in New Hampshire. Their lives (and the lives of others in the small community) are disrupted again by the arrival of a 14-year-old "white Indian" boy, captured by the Indians when he was small and now totally assimilated into Abenaki culture. When the girls' precious spoons are stolen and Indians raid the fort, the boy is suspected of both thievery and treachery. Rebecca's efforts to search out the truth put her in satisfyingly heart-stopping danger. An overview of the French and Indian War follows the story. --Connie Fletcher


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Rebecca Percy's parents and baby brother have been kidnapped by the Abenaki Indians on the dangerous 1754 New Hampshire frontier, leaving Rebecca and her sister to seek shelter at Fort Number 4 with kindly Widow Tyler. The work is hard, but Rebecca never gives up hope that her family might have been sold to the French, who often ransomed captives back to the English. She reacts with fear and disgust, however, when the woman takes in Isaac, a white boy who has been raised by the Abenakis and remains loyal to them. Shortly after his arrival, a series of thefts occur among the settlers. Of course, Isaac is the logical suspect. The plot is carefully built with interesting and well-researched historical details. The mystery is also well crafted, and children will enjoy gathering clues and trying to guess the outcome. Characterizations are strong, with believable growth. For example, Rebecca develops empathy for the Abenakis, moving from a hateful attitude toward a greater understanding of their desperate situation. The relationships between the Native people and the settlers are complex, and are responsibly and respectfully presented.-Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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