Cover image for Meaner than meanest
Title:
Meaner than meanest
Author:
Somers, Kevin.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, 2001.
Physical Description:
pages cm
Summary:
An old hag tries to make the most evil creature in the world, but her spell goes wrong and she ends up with an annoyingly sweet little girl instead.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.8 0.5 57050.
ISBN:
9780786824984

9780786805778
Format :
Book

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Central Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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Kenmore Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Audubon Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Summary

Summary

An old hag tries to make the most evil creature in the world, but her spell goes wrong and she ends up with an annoyingly sweet little girl instead.


Summary

In a rickety old hovel in a wooded swamp lives an evil old hag, who is the second-meanest creature alive. She is only the second meanest because her cat, Hisss, is even meaner than she is. And this Halloween, the hag is determined to make a creature that will be the meanest creature yet! But when she slips up and leaves out the eye of newt out of her recipe, the hag's worst fears are realized. Out of the bubbling brew comes&mdashugh!&mdashthe sweetest little girl she never wanted to meet, Daisy. How long will the hag be able to stand this little ray of sunshine?


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

When brewing "slimy sweat from a speckled frog," scorpions and snakes, a crone must never, ever forget the eye of newt. In Somers's children's debut, a hunchbacked, green-faced hag omits that magic ingredient from her monster recipe and accidentally concocts Daisy, a cloyingly cute girl. Blumenthal (Matilda the Moocher) gives Daisy confectionary-pink tresses and pictures the child cuddling Hisss, a vicious black cat who steals the show with his wicked eyes and needle fangs. This haunted farce's punchline the witch smiles suggests that kindness trumps "meaner than meanest." Ages 4-7. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-An entertaining concoction is brewed up in this Halloween offering. A far-from-fetching, green-faced, warty old hag lives in a hovel in the middle of a wooded swamp. She is a thoroughly mean creature, second only to her evil cat named Hisss, and they delight in their mutual disdain of one another. When the hag realizes that Halloween is approaching, she decides to create the most evil creature in the world to make the holiday truly festive. She consults a tome entitled Monster Recipes for Witches, Hags, and Mean Old Bats. Into the cauldron go scorpions, sticky spiders, snakes, squishy snails, and a host of other nasty ingredients. The hag realizes too late that she has left out an essential part of the recipe so out of the monstrous cocoon pops a little girl who introduces herself as Daisy. The child's saccharine disposition drives the hag wild, but when extreme measures such as locking her in the damp, dark cellar with Hisss result in a tea party, the witch takes to her bed. It is only on Halloween that Daisy finds a way to make even the Queen of Mean smile. Appropriately wacky cartoon illustrations enhance the humor of this light Halloween foray. Libraries that need jovial Halloween tales will want to purchase it.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

When brewing "slimy sweat from a speckled frog," scorpions and snakes, a crone must never, ever forget the eye of newt. In Somers's children's debut, a hunchbacked, green-faced hag omits that magic ingredient from her monster recipe and accidentally concocts Daisy, a cloyingly cute girl. Blumenthal (Matilda the Moocher) gives Daisy confectionary-pink tresses and pictures the child cuddling Hisss, a vicious black cat who steals the show with his wicked eyes and needle fangs. This haunted farce's punchline the witch smiles suggests that kindness trumps "meaner than meanest." Ages 4-7. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-An entertaining concoction is brewed up in this Halloween offering. A far-from-fetching, green-faced, warty old hag lives in a hovel in the middle of a wooded swamp. She is a thoroughly mean creature, second only to her evil cat named Hisss, and they delight in their mutual disdain of one another. When the hag realizes that Halloween is approaching, she decides to create the most evil creature in the world to make the holiday truly festive. She consults a tome entitled Monster Recipes for Witches, Hags, and Mean Old Bats. Into the cauldron go scorpions, sticky spiders, snakes, squishy snails, and a host of other nasty ingredients. The hag realizes too late that she has left out an essential part of the recipe so out of the monstrous cocoon pops a little girl who introduces herself as Daisy. The child's saccharine disposition drives the hag wild, but when extreme measures such as locking her in the damp, dark cellar with Hisss result in a tea party, the witch takes to her bed. It is only on Halloween that Daisy finds a way to make even the Queen of Mean smile. Appropriately wacky cartoon illustrations enhance the humor of this light Halloween foray. Libraries that need jovial Halloween tales will want to purchase it.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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