Cover image for Monster museum
Title:
Monster museum
Author:
Singer, Marilyn.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books For Children, 2001.
Physical Description:
40 pages : illustrations; 26 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.2 0.5 57413.

Reading Counts RC K-2 4.1 2 Quiz: 31793 Guided reading level: NR.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780786805204

9780786824571
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3569.I546 M6 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Come in&mdashif you dare&mdashand meet the werewolf, Count Dracula, the mummy, and some of their slimy, screaming, slithering friends. They're just dying to show you a good time!


Author Notes

Marilyn Singer was born in the Bronx, New York, on October 3, 1948, and lived most of her early life in North Massapequa on Long Island. She attended Queens College, City University of New York as an English major and education student, and for her junior year, attended Reading University, in England. She holds a bachelor's degree in English from Queens and a MA in Communications from New York University. Marilyn Singer had been teaching English in New York City high schools for several years when she began writing in 1974. Initially, she wrote film notes, catalogues, teacher's guides and filmstrips. She also began looking into magazine writing. Her article proposals were not very successful, but she did manage to have some of her poetry published. Then one day she penned a story featuring talking insects she'd made up when she was eight. Encouraged by the responses she got, she wrote more stories and in 1976 her first book, The Dog Who Insisted He Wasn't, was published.

Since then, Marilyn has published more than 50 books for children and young adults. In addition to a rich collection of fiction picture books, Singer has also produced a wide variety of nonfiction works for young readers as well as several poetry volumes in picture book format. Additionally, Singer has edited volumes of short stories for young adult readers, including Stay True: Short Stories for Strong Girls and I Believe in Water: Twelve Brushes with Religion.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

To the rollicking beat of Singer's (The Circus Lunicus) absurd poems, children trail an undead docent through a "monster museum" where the exhibits are wax replicas... or are they? The visitors see Frankenstein's creation ("I'm called Frankenstein,/ but it's his name, not mine"), the Blob and "Those mixed-up beasts from ancient Greece: the chimera, the cockatrice." Grimly, a Charles Addams devotee, packs the spreads with frantic activity that rewards sharp eyes; on the tour, sneaky things ambush museum-goers. Among the season's best creature features. Ages 5-9. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-5-Singer describes an array of scary apparitions and frightful figures in this "ghastly" collection of poems. Children walk through a museum filled with monsters, memorialized in a variety of poetic forms-from limericks to litanies. For example, they meet poor misunderstood Frankenstein, who wants his own name, instead of that of his inventor. The entry for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a two-voiced poetic offering that pits one side of the man against the other. Grimly's colorful caricatures add to the madcap fun. Several of the monsters wend their way out to the parking lot-one even drives the school bus. The "Glos-Scary" helps to keep all of the creatures straight. This fresh, witty book will be popular for not-so-scary storytimes, as well as independent reading. The humor and wordplay running rampant adds to the delight of the whole museum visit. Another howling success for this versatile author.-Kay Bowes, Concord Pike Library, Wilmington, DE (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.