Cover image for Hanna's Christmas
Title:
Hanna's Christmas
Author:
Peterson, Melissa.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[New York?] : HarperFestival, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.6 0.5 54083.
Subject Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780694013715
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Hanna can't get used to the idea of celebrating Christmas in America. In fact, she wishes her family hadn't moved to America at all! It's nothing like home in Sweden. Luckily, Hanna's grandmother sends her a magical friend--a tomten--who may just be able to help her bring a Swedish Christmas to her new home.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In Hanna's Christmas by Melissa Peterson, illus. by Melissa Iwai, ostensibly about Santa Lucia Day, the Swedish tradition associated with Christmas, homesickness for her homeland and grandmother hits Hanna hard as she makes preparations in her new American home. A magical "tomten" helps solve Hanna's problems. Hanna Andersson clothing figures prominently in the pictures. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-The move from Sweden to America is not as exciting to young Hanna as it is to her family. She is forced to say good-bye to her grandmother, the farm animals, and her home. Then a crate arrives from Mormor filled with wonderful things to remind the family of their homeland: a box of chocolates, a jar of homemade jam, and a long, lacy white dress for Hanna to wear on Santa Lucia Day. Inside the packing straw Hanna also finds a "tomten," a magical creature said to bring good luck or mischief depending on his mood, and this one does not look happy. He is angry that he is not on the farm and proceeds to go on a mischief-making rampage. Hanna is blamed and when her parents tell her "enough is enough," she sets out to try and make the tomten feel more at home, ultimately resulting in her own satisfaction about being there. The smoothly integrated plotline and colorful acrylic artwork provide a unique context and glimpse into another culture.-P. G. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.