Cover image for Peter Claus and the naughty list
Title:
Peter Claus and the naughty list
Author:
David, Lawrence.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Doubleday Books for Young Readers, 2001.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Peter Claus, the son of Santa, feels sorry for all the kids on the naughty list who will not get Christmas presents and tries to persuade his father that they deserve a second chance.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 0.5 75235.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780385326544
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Summary

Summary

Naughty or nice? Peter Claus thinks this yearly question is most unfair. As Santa's son, he should know. For the second year in a row his name appears on the dreaded Naughty List. That means no presents for Christmas! But Peter doesn't remember misbehaving--at least not enough to deserve such a harsh punishment. Taking the reins to Santa's sleigh, Peter rounds up all the naughty children the world over. He wants Santa to hear their side. Maybe then Santa will see that not receiving gifts at Christmas isn't the fairest way to deal with kids who do bad deeds. Peter's not sure if his plans will work, but he does know a lot of boys and girls need his help if they have any chance of waking up to a merry Christmas.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4-7. Peter Claus, son of Santa, has the unpleasant task of putting the names of children in lists labeled "naughty" or "nice." It's all a matter of numbers; if the bad acts outweigh the good, even by one, you're naughty. Peter has great pity for the naughty crowd (he's been on the list himself), so he decides to gather naughty children from around the world to plead their case to Santa. Santa does give them a break: if the children apologize and find a way to undo a bit of naughtiness, they can switch lists. When it's Peter's turn, Santa informs him that by bringing the children together, he has done the nicest thing of all. This is a delightful mix of message, moral, and merry holiday fun wrapped around a situation that plenty of kids can identify with. The sturdy, blocky artwork is distinctive, and Durand never misses an opportunity to inject humor. One montage shows errant children doing all sorts of mischievous things, including a boy who not only spills his milk but also floats his sailboat in it. The richness of detail in the art and the hope that bad actions can be wiped out will keep kids coming back for more readings. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Santa's son, Peter, devises a plan to spring himself and all the other misbehavers from the dreaded naughty list in this humorous picture book from the creators of Beetle Boy. The text skates close to moralistic in places ("Saying you're sorry is what matters most"), but the delightfully skewed sensibility of the illustrations saves the day. Equal parts cartoon and folk art, Durand infuses the artwork with a puckish wit. Ages 6-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Santa has a hard and fast rule: if your naughty deeds total more than your nice ones, you get NO PRESENTS. His son, Peter, spending his second year on the naughty list, doesn't think this is fair. So, he hijacks the sleigh and reindeer and takes all of the naughty kids to the North Pole to plea their cases before Santa. The youngsters admit to unkind acts, say they are sorry, and offer to do something thoughtful for the injured parties. One by one, the names are eliminated from the list. Happy for the others, Peter wishes he could do something nice and Santa tells him that he has by helping the children and their families. This simple, humorous story goes straight to big childhood concerns-who keeps track of naughty and nice, how the present issue is decided, and if you are an OK kid even if you are naughty sometimes. Durand's witty primitive paintings are full of fun and detail with oddly shaped people and reindeer enjoying a satisfying Christmas in which there are only nice kids.-A. C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.