Cover image for The water hole
Title:
The water hole
Author:
Base, Graeme.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Harry N. Abrams, 2001.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
As ever growing numbers of animals visit a watering hole, introducing the numbers from one to ten, the water dwindles.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 230 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.4 0.5 58599.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.2 1 Quiz: 26565 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780810945685
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The Water Hole is a fusion of counting book, puzzle book, storybook and art book. Graeme Base takes the reader on a journey of discovery, from the plains of Africa and the jungles of the Amazon to the woodlands of North America and the deserts of the Australian outback.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3-6. From the creator of Animalia (1986) and The Sign of the Seahorse (1992) comes another beautifully illustrated animal fantasy, this time doubling as counting exercises. "Down at the secret water hole the animals all come," the text begins, and on each spread, animals from an international roundup gather to take a drink: one rhino, two tigers, and so on, until, by "ten kangaroos," the water has run dry. Luckily, the rains come, bringing everyone together. There's so much to look at here: lush vegetation; lively, detailed animal characters; cutouts that represent the shrinking water supply. Sly humor, sometimes geared towards adults, comes in quotes from the animals--first, as they sound to humans ("ark, ark! Arrrk!"); then revealing what's actually being said ("It's party time, fellas! Drink up!" ). The story is slim, but the ideas are powerful--life's dependence on water; the concept of limited resources--and children will savor the gorgeous, animal-packed spreads. --Gillian Engberg


Publisher's Weekly Review

Successive spreads introduce a growing number of animals at a water hole that, as viewed through die-cut ovals, becomes smaller with each turn of the page. "Readers will find more to see the longer they linger over these enticing pages," wrote PW. Ages 4-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3 Up-Come to the water hole and immerse yourself in an extravagant experience. The offering from a master of visual delight is at once a counting book, a zoological tour, and a fascinating hidden-picture challenge. As 10 different animals from 10 different countries come to quench their thirst, a metaphorical water hole diminishes until it dries up completely and the visitors leave. Then the cycle begins again with a single drop of water, a torrent of rain, and a luxuriant new watering hole that draws all of the creatures back again. With a quarter page of simple counting text and three-quarters page of sumptuous watercolor and gouache, the story unfolds on many levels. The water hole itself is a concentric cutout oval that shrinks from page to page. There are silhouettes in the borders of the creatures indigenous to each country and those same animals are hidden in the dense background. A comic note is added with 10 frogs, some wearing clothes, whose numbers also decrease as the water dries up. While some children may miss the illustrative subtleties indicating that each water hole is actually in a different part of the world, this numerical and ecological companion to Animalia (Abrams, 1987) is a visual treat.-Beth Tegart, Oneida City Schools, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.