Cover image for Leonardo's horse
Title:
Leonardo's horse
Author:
Fritz, Jean.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Putnam's , 2001.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations, color map ; 30 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
660 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.6 0.5 54098.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.1 3 Quiz: 26696 Guided reading level: O.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780399235764
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library NB623.L6 .F77 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Clarence Library NB623.L6 .F77 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library NB623.L6 .F77 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Collins Library NB623.L6 .F77 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library NB623.L6 .F77 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library NB623.L6 .F77 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library NB623.L6 .F77 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"A scintillating sliver of history. . . . An inventive introduction to the Renaissance and one of its masters." ( Publishers Weekly , starred review)

"An unusual and surprisingly touching story . . . . An offbeat and intriguing read." ( The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books , starred review)

"At times sad, silly, and telling, this is a wholly entertaining book." ( School Library Journal , starred review)

"Filled with engaging details of Leonardo and his world. . . . Illustrations which range from utterly recognizable scenes of Florence to the ghostly horses at Leonardo's deathbed. . . . An unusual biography for young people, and one well worth poring over . . . . A unique way of picturing a unique world . . . . An extraordinary tribute." ( Kirkus Reviews , starred review)


Author Notes

Jean Fritz was born in Hankow, China on November 16, 1915. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Wheaton College in 1937. She wrote picture books and historical fiction before focusing on historical nonfiction. Her first book, Bunny Hopewell's First Spring, was published in 1954. Her other books included And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?; Will You Sign Here, John Hancock?; Can't You Make Them Behave, King George?; Shh! We're Writing the Constitution; Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold; Where Do You Think You're Going, Christopher Columbus?; Who's That Stepping on Plymouth Rock?; The Double Life of Pocahontas; and George Washington's Mother.

Homesick: My Own Story, a collection of linked narratives, traces her life from her girlhood in China to her longed-for yet uneasy passage to America. It won a National Book Award and was named a Newbery Honor Book. She received the Regina Medal by the Catholic Library Association, the National Humanities Medal, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award and the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature for her body of work. She died on May 14, 2017 at the age of 101.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-7. The first part of this unusual book presents the life and work of Leonardo da Vinci, highlighting his work on a monumental statue of a horse, which, despite many sketches and the making, in 1493, of a 24-foot-high clay model, was never cast in bronze as planned. The story begins again in 1977, when American art lover Charles Dent read about Leonardo's horse. He dreamed of completing the statue and presenting it to the people of Italy from the people of America. Although Dent died in 1994, the work went on until sculptor Nina Akamu completed the statue, which was unveiled in Milan in 1999, 500 years after the destruction of the original clay sculpture. Combining biography, history, and art, Fritz's absorbing text is both a lively introduction to Leonardo and a tribute to Dent. The curious shape of the book--rectangular at the bottom and rounded at the top--is reminiscent of the silhouette of a domed building, and illustrator Talbott makes good use of the irregularly shaped pages in his pleasing and occasionally dramatic illustrations, which are done in watercolor, pen-and-ink, colored pencils, and collage. A memorable choice for reading aloud. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Fritz (And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?) again calls upon her informal yet informative style to spotlight a scintillating sliver of history, recounted in two related tales. Her narrative opens as the ultimate Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci, earns a commission from the duke of Milan to create a sculpture to honor the duke's father a bronze horse three times larger than life. Though this creative genius spent years on the project, he died without realizing his dream and, writes Fritz, "It was said that even on his deathbed, Leonardo wept for his horse." The author then fast-forwards to 1977: an American named Charles Dent vows to create the sculpture and make it a gift from the American people to the residents of Italy. How his goal was accomplished (alas, posthumously) makes for an intriguing tale that Fritz deftly relays. Talbott's (Forging Freedom) diverse multimedia artwork includes reproductions of da Vinci's notebooks, panoramas revealing the Renaissance in lavish detail and majestic renderings of the final equine sculpture. Talbott makes creative use of the book's format a rectangle topped by a semi-circle: the rounded space by turns becomes a window through which da Vinci views a cloud shaped like a flying horse; the domed building that was Dent's studio and gallery; and a globe depicting the route the bronze horse travels on its way from the U.S. to Italy. An inventive introduction to the Renaissance and one of its masters. Ages 5-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

A careful explanation of how da Vinci's unfinished bronze horse became a 20th-century reality. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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