Cover image for The man who wore all his clothes
Title:
The man who wore all his clothes
Author:
Ahlberg, Allan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, MA : Candlewick Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
77 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
Mrs. Gaskitt the taxi driver, Mr. Gaskitt the heavily dressed man, and their twins, Gus and Gloria, foil a bank robbery.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.2 0.5 54927.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780763614324
Format :
Book

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Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Kenmore Library X Juvenile Fiction Easy Fiction
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Kenmore Library X Juvenile Fiction Easy Fiction
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Williamsville Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Mrs. Gaskitt the taxi driver, Mr. Gaskitt the heavily dressed man, and their twins, Gus and Gloria, foil a bank robbery.


Author Notes

Allan Ahlberg was born in 1938 in South London, and grew up in the Black Country. He worked as a teacher, postman, grave digger, soldier and plumber's mate before he became a full-time writer.

He met his wife and creative partner, Janet at teacher training college. It was because Janet wanted to illustrate a book that Allan wrote his first book, the Brick Street boys. After that, together they wrote 37 books.

Janet died in 1994 and Ahlberg discontinued his writing career for a few years before picking it up again.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

An appealingly madcap plot, dialogue that verges on slapstick and sprightly pictures keep this early chapter book rolling along at a snappy clip. Ahlberg (The Snail House) introduces Mr. and Mrs. Gaskitt and their nine-year-old twins, Gus and Gloria. One December morning, Mr. Gaskitt gets dressed, donning multiple layers of clothing: "He put on his tee shirt and underwear and socks, and his socks and tee shirt and underwear, and his underwear and socks and tee shirt." While he drives off in his car to an undisclosed location, Mrs. Gaskitt zooms off in her taxi to pick up a passenger whom kids will immediately recognize as a bank robber. The culprit eventually flees the taxi and boards a school bus carrying Gus and Gloria and their classmates, precipitating a farcical chase scene involving the bus, both Gaskitt parents' vehicles, a police car and the van of a camera-toting news reporter. Ahlberg adds to the mayhem with some absurd asides: the radio in Mr. Gaskitt's car bungles the news reports and the twins' teacher barks such instructions as "Fingers on lips! Elbows on knees!" McEwen's (Cows in the Kitchen) watercolor and crayon art comically captures the lighthearted tone of the tale, topped off by the revelation of the well-padded pater's profession: playing Santa. This is good silly fun. Ages 7-9. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Why is skinny Mr. Gaskitt putting on all his clothes? How does Mrs. Gaskitt's taxi become a getaway vehicle for some bank robbers? How does the children's school bus get involved in the heist? And, most importantly, what do all these madcap activities have to do with the newspaper headline, "Father Christmas Saves the Day"? This is only tangentially a Christmas tale, but independent readers will zip through the easy-reading, 10-chapter story. Watercolor-and-crayon illustrations on pages beautifully designed to include lots of white space result in an inviting look. Numerous funny touches in text and illustrations and a surprise ending will lure many readers back for a second pleasurable run through the mayhem.-S. P. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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