Cover image for Baby on the way
Title:
Baby on the way
Author:
Sears, William, 1939-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little, Brown, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
pages 24cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780316787673
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
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RG525.5 .S42 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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RG525.5 .S42 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RG525.5 .S42 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RG525.5 .S42 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RG525.5 .S42 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RG525.5 .S42 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RG525.5 .S42 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Part of a two-book debut of the Sears Children's Library picture books, this title provides helpful information for young children expecting a new brother and sister. Full color.


Author Notes

William Sears, M.D., received his pediatric training at Harvard Medical School's Children's Hospital & Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, the largest children's hospital in the world. He has practiced as a pediatrician for nearly thirty years & is a former assistant professor at the University of Southern California School of Medicine. He & Martha Sears are the parents of eight children.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. These two volumes, presented in an accessible picture-book format, offer children facts and insights about living with a pregnant mother and living with a new baby. The text of each book strikes an informal, yet informative tone, utilizing the knowledge of a doctor and nurse on the writing team. The young audience is addressed in second person, as in this passage from Baby on the Way, "As the baby gets bigger, your mommy's lap gets smaller and smaller. But there's always room for you on your mommy's lap." What Baby Needs is a good choice for parents who take exception (understandably) to books that introduce the new-baby theme in conjunction with sibling rivalry. Instead, the focus is on things like what the older child can do that the baby can't, and how to make friends with the baby. Andriani's brightly colored, cartoon-style illustrations help create the books' upbeat, yet realistic tone. Two appealing books for older siblings, with helpful notes for parents and caregivers. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Big brothers and sisters seeking reassurance will appreciate Baby on the Way by noted adult authors Dr. William Sears and Martha Sears (The Baby Book; The Pregnancy Book) as well as Christie Watts Kelly, illus. by Ren?e Andriani. Physical and emotional realities of pregnancy are likened to things a child can understand. Morning sickness, the authors explain, is similar to "the way your tummy feels yucky when you eat three slices of birthday cake and ice cream." Sidebars throughout suggest things siblings can do to prepare for baby's arrival, such as visiting the doctor with their mother, or asking her "what it felt like when you were growing inside her." An endnote offers tips to parents and suggests additional resources. What Baby Needs, from the same team, helps siblings adjust to having the new baby in the house. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Appealing picture books written by attachment-parenting advocates. In the first title, the anticipation of a baby is shown as an opportunity for family members to love and support one another. The text, addressed to an older sibling, describes both the changes that the family prepares for and the ways that the baby, growing inside the mother's uterus, might make her feel: hungry, thirsty, and tired. Older brothers and sisters are encouraged to see themselves as competent to contribute at this time. What Baby Needs is a warm look at how life in the family changes to accommodate the needs of a newborn, and the care an infant requires. Both texts are prefaced by notes for adults on what kind of information and experiences might be helpful or appropriate to share with a child. In addition, sets of text bars throughout give parents and youngsters the opportunity to talk more about the issues raised by the simpler text of the books. In each book, the lighthearted, full-color cartoons bring some welcome new images to baby books: breastfeeding, babywearing (including both a dad and a mom with an infant in a baby sling), and the newborn snoozing near the parents' bed in an adjacent co-sleeper. Final pages in both volumes provide interested adults with notes on attachment parenting, including its key components (birth bonding, breastfeeding, babywearing, co-sleeping, and belief in the language value of a baby's cry).-Kathie Meizner, Montgomery County Public Libraries, Chevy Chase, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.