Cover image for His mother's nose
Title:
His mother's nose
Author:
Maloney, Peter, 1955 November 7-
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 2001.
Physical Description:
40 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 22 x 27 cm
Summary:
A young boy is told that he has his mother's nose, his sister's eyes, his uncle's head for numbers, and other traits from different family members, but he comes to realize that there is nobody quite like him.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803725454
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Everyone says Percival has his mother's nose, his father's eyes, his sister'shair, and so on, so who is he really? Full-color illustrations. 10 1/2x 8 1/2.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. "From the day Percival Puddicombe was born, he was not his own man." He has his mother's nose, his father's eyes, his sister's mouth, his brother's hair, his aunt's ear for music, and his uncle's head for numbers. He grows so tired of hearing it he leaves home and goes to visit his grandparents, "the only people who always saw him as himself." In the family photo album, he sees pictures of family members whom he's never met, and every one has some familiar feature. That's when Percival begins to understand that there's "a little bit of everyone in everybody." In a gratifying ending, Percival receives the distinction he deserves when his mother tells him, "there's nobody quite like you!" With gouache and pencil cartoon-style illustrations that are dynamic, expressive, and often hilarious, this is another impressive offering from a talented team. --Lauren Peterson


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this perceptive account of family traits, Maloney and Zekauskas (previously paired for Belly Button Boy) consider individual and generational points of view. Their young hero, Percival, feels he is "not his own man. Everyone who saw Percival saw something of themselves in him." But the boy wants to be more than the sum of "his mother's nose, his father's eyes, his sister's mouth,... his aunt's ear for music." He runs away to his grandparents' house, where he receives an urgent message: "Your mother just said you were missing. And so is her nose!" Maloney and Zekauskas fantasize that, without Percival, the family loses actual anatomical parts. Then they picture Percival leafing through black-and-white photos and recognizing himself in much older relatives. They show that Percival is part of a continuum; by returning home, he literally and figuratively restores the missing pieces ("You've saved the whole family!" his mother declares, in a poignant double-entendre). Maloney and Zekauskas's rather awkward gouaches play up the humor rather than the poignancy of this sympathetic narrative of belonging, which argues that there is "a little bit of everyone in everybody." Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-"From the day Percival Puddicombe was born, he was not his own man. Everyone-saw something of themselves in him." He has his mother's nose, his father's eyes, his brother's unruly red hair, and, as he grows, his uncle's amazing talent in math and aunt's ear for music. The child eventually gets angry, and the next morning those features all disappear from the family members. It turns out that Percival has run away to his grandparents, "the only people who always saw him as himself." As they show him the family photo album, he realizes there is "a little bit of everyone in everybody," and returns home. Children are likely to wonder why the various features disappear when the child leaves and reappear when he returns. The brightly colored gouache-and-pencil cartoon illustrations are not unattractive, but they are not strong enough to save this trite, plotless story.-Janet M. Bair, Trumbull Library, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.