Cover image for Thomas Eakins
Title:
Thomas Eakins
Author:
Sewell, Darrel, 1939-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Philadelphia, Pa. : Philadelphia Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xli, 446 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 32 cm
General Note:
Exhibition held at Philadelphia Museum of Art, Oct. 4, 2001 to Jan. 6, 2002, Musée d'Orsay, Paris, Feb. 5 to May 12, 2002, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, June 18 to Sept. 15, 2002.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780876331439

9780876331422

9780300091113
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N6537.E3 A4 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

"Thomas Eakins' scenes of rowing, sailing, and boxing as well as his deeply moving portraits are renowned for their vibrant realism and dramatic intensity. This beautiful and insightful book, published in conjunction with a major exhibition on the life and career of Eakins - the first in twenty years - presents a fresh perspective on the artist and his remarkable accomplishments." "Lavishly illustrated with more than 250 of Eakins's most significant paintings, watercolors, drawings, photographs, and sculpture, the book features essays by prominent scholars who place his art in the context of the history and culture of late nineteenth-century Philadelphia, where he lived."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Summary

"Thomas Eakins' scenes of rowing, sailing, and boxing as well as his deeply moving portraits are renowned for their vibrant realism and dramatic intensity. This beautiful and insightful book, published in conjunction with a major exhibition on the life and career of Eakins - the first in twenty years - presents a fresh perspective on the artist and his remarkable accomplishments." "Lavishly illustrated with more than 250 of Eakins's most significant paintings, watercolors, drawings, photographs, and sculpture, the book features essays by prominent scholars who place his art in the context of the history and culture of late nineteenth-century Philadelphia, where he lived."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Summary

Thomas Eakins (1844-1916) is one of the most fascinating and important personalities in the history of American art. His memorable and much-loved scenes of rowing, sailing, and boxing as well as his deeply moving portraits are renowned for their vibrant realism and dramatic intensity. This beautiful and insightful book, published in conjunction with a major exhibition on the life and career of Eakins - the first in twenty years - presents a fresh perspective on the artist and his remarkable accomplishments. Lavishly illustrated with more than 250 of Eakins's most significant paintings, watercolours, drawings, and sculpture, the book features essays by prominent scholars who place his art in the context of the history and culture of late nineteenth-century Philadelphia, where he lived. The contributors also discuss how Eakins applied his French academic training to subjects that were distinctly American and part of his own immediate and complex experience. Eakins's own photographs, which he used as part of his unique creative process, are also examined for the first time in the full context of his life's work. The exhibition Thomas Eakins will be on view at the Philadelphia Museum o


Author Notes

Darrell Sewell is the Robert L. McNeil, Jr., Curator of American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Darrell Sewell is the Robert L. McNeil, Jr., Curator of American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 9

Publisher's Weekly Review

Accompanying the first major retrospective in more than 20 years of a major American artist, this catalogue is simply ravishing. Eakins (1844-1916) produced some of the most hauntingly beautiful pastoral paintings and portraits of any era, in a manner related to but distinct from contemporaries J.M. Whistler and Winslow Homer. Sewell, Robert L. McNeil Jr. curator of American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (in Eakins's home city, whence the exhibit originates), divides Eakins's career into four distinct periods, bringing together compelling strands of Eakins scholarship, particularly on the systematic sets of photographs the artist took and from which he often worked, including Muybridgian motion studies. Seeing and reading about the transformation of enigmatic sepia-toned photographic nudes (often including the artist) into Eakins's art is little short of breathtaking. The "homotextuality" of many of them has been the subject of much recent critical inquiry, but the essays gathered by Sewell are assiduously noncommittal as to Eakins's sexual practice. There are more than 575 illustrations in all, 250 of which are in color and full-page. Fabulously printed, thoughtful and formally exhaustive, this will be the definitive Eakins catalogue for the foreseeable future. (Nov.) Forecast: The exhibition which will be in Philadelphia from October through January, travels to Paris's Mus?e d'Orsay and the Met in New York over the next year; it should be a blockbuster that results in strong sales at the museum shops. Gift tables (especially gay and lesbian) and university libraries are also a lock price will deter few, given the lavishness of the printing. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Unlike his aristocratic contemporaries John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase, the great 19th-century realist painter Thomas Eakins depicted more prosaic topics, such as people boxing and rowing and musicians at work. While his pictures lack the enigmatic air that his peers achieved, in his passion and exactitude Eakins can be favorably compared with his idols Vel zquez and Rembrandt. He was both a hero to his students and an outcast from the Pennsylvania Academy of Art, where he was forced to resign in 1886 after daring to study the male nude with female students. This enormous volume accompanies the largest retrospective of his work yet, organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In addition to 60 well-known easel pictures, the exhibition and this catalog includes some 120 photographs as well as examples of his work in watercolor, drawing, and sculpture. As an event, it's a turning point in expanding Eakins's reputation; only in recent decades have critics taken note of his efforts beyond painting. Several lengthy and interesting biocritical essays, themselves making up 175 pages of text, separate four sections of color plates. This is clearly the definitive monograph on one of the most significant artists America has produced. Recommended for all libraries. Douglas F. Smith, Oakland P.L., CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This largest and latest publication on Eakins (1844-1916), with its 295 color illustrations and 220 black-and-white illustrations, functions partly as the catalog of an Eakins retrospective that will appear at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. But it is much more than an exhibition catalog. It is, as the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Web site claims, a compendium of all the latest scholarship on Eakins, and "will introduce a new generation of the public to this great painter and key figure in American art." The last full-scale retrospective of the artist's work took place in 1982 (also at the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Since then, a number of unknown works by Eakins have come to light, and a cadre of scholars have been exploring such topics as Eakins's interest in photography and his preoccupation with sports like sailing, rowing, and fishing. This volume contains essays contributed by a host of important Eakins scholars, among them H. Barbara Weinberg, Elizabeth Milroy, Kathleen A. Foster, Marc Simpson, Carol Troyen, and William Innes Homer. Highly recommended. All levels. M. W. Sullivan Villanova University


Publisher's Weekly Review

Accompanying the first major retrospective in more than 20 years of a major American artist, this catalogue is simply ravishing. Eakins (1844-1916) produced some of the most hauntingly beautiful pastoral paintings and portraits of any era, in a manner related to but distinct from contemporaries J.M. Whistler and Winslow Homer. Sewell, Robert L. McNeil Jr. curator of American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (in Eakins's home city, whence the exhibit originates), divides Eakins's career into four distinct periods, bringing together compelling strands of Eakins scholarship, particularly on the systematic sets of photographs the artist took and from which he often worked, including Muybridgian motion studies. Seeing and reading about the transformation of enigmatic sepia-toned photographic nudes (often including the artist) into Eakins's art is little short of breathtaking. The "homotextuality" of many of them has been the subject of much recent critical inquiry, but the essays gathered by Sewell are assiduously noncommittal as to Eakins's sexual practice. There are more than 575 illustrations in all, 250 of which are in color and full-page. Fabulously printed, thoughtful and formally exhaustive, this will be the definitive Eakins catalogue for the foreseeable future. (Nov.) Forecast: The exhibition which will be in Philadelphia from October through January, travels to Paris's Mus?e d'Orsay and the Met in New York over the next year; it should be a blockbuster that results in strong sales at the museum shops. Gift tables (especially gay and lesbian) and university libraries are also a lock price will deter few, given the lavishness of the printing. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Unlike his aristocratic contemporaries John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase, the great 19th-century realist painter Thomas Eakins depicted more prosaic topics, such as people boxing and rowing and musicians at work. While his pictures lack the enigmatic air that his peers achieved, in his passion and exactitude Eakins can be favorably compared with his idols Vel zquez and Rembrandt. He was both a hero to his students and an outcast from the Pennsylvania Academy of Art, where he was forced to resign in 1886 after daring to study the male nude with female students. This enormous volume accompanies the largest retrospective of his work yet, organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In addition to 60 well-known easel pictures, the exhibition and this catalog includes some 120 photographs as well as examples of his work in watercolor, drawing, and sculpture. As an event, it's a turning point in expanding Eakins's reputation; only in recent decades have critics taken note of his efforts beyond painting. Several lengthy and interesting biocritical essays, themselves making up 175 pages of text, separate four sections of color plates. This is clearly the definitive monograph on one of the most significant artists America has produced. Recommended for all libraries. Douglas F. Smith, Oakland P.L., CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This largest and latest publication on Eakins (1844-1916), with its 295 color illustrations and 220 black-and-white illustrations, functions partly as the catalog of an Eakins retrospective that will appear at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. But it is much more than an exhibition catalog. It is, as the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Web site claims, a compendium of all the latest scholarship on Eakins, and "will introduce a new generation of the public to this great painter and key figure in American art." The last full-scale retrospective of the artist's work took place in 1982 (also at the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Since then, a number of unknown works by Eakins have come to light, and a cadre of scholars have been exploring such topics as Eakins's interest in photography and his preoccupation with sports like sailing, rowing, and fishing. This volume contains essays contributed by a host of important Eakins scholars, among them H. Barbara Weinberg, Elizabeth Milroy, Kathleen A. Foster, Marc Simpson, Carol Troyen, and William Innes Homer. Highly recommended. All levels. M. W. Sullivan Villanova University


Publisher's Weekly Review

Accompanying the first major retrospective in more than 20 years of a major American artist, this catalogue is simply ravishing. Eakins (1844-1916) produced some of the most hauntingly beautiful pastoral paintings and portraits of any era, in a manner related to but distinct from contemporaries J.M. Whistler and Winslow Homer. Sewell, Robert L. McNeil Jr. curator of American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (in Eakins's home city, whence the exhibit originates), divides Eakins's career into four distinct periods, bringing together compelling strands of Eakins scholarship, particularly on the systematic sets of photographs the artist took and from which he often worked, including Muybridgian motion studies. Seeing and reading about the transformation of enigmatic sepia-toned photographic nudes (often including the artist) into Eakins's art is little short of breathtaking. The "homotextuality" of many of them has been the subject of much recent critical inquiry, but the essays gathered by Sewell are assiduously noncommittal as to Eakins's sexual practice. There are more than 575 illustrations in all, 250 of which are in color and full-page. Fabulously printed, thoughtful and formally exhaustive, this will be the definitive Eakins catalogue for the foreseeable future. (Nov.) Forecast: The exhibition which will be in Philadelphia from October through January, travels to Paris's Mus?e d'Orsay and the Met in New York over the next year; it should be a blockbuster that results in strong sales at the museum shops. Gift tables (especially gay and lesbian) and university libraries are also a lock price will deter few, given the lavishness of the printing. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Unlike his aristocratic contemporaries John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase, the great 19th-century realist painter Thomas Eakins depicted more prosaic topics, such as people boxing and rowing and musicians at work. While his pictures lack the enigmatic air that his peers achieved, in his passion and exactitude Eakins can be favorably compared with his idols Vel zquez and Rembrandt. He was both a hero to his students and an outcast from the Pennsylvania Academy of Art, where he was forced to resign in 1886 after daring to study the male nude with female students. This enormous volume accompanies the largest retrospective of his work yet, organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In addition to 60 well-known easel pictures, the exhibition and this catalog includes some 120 photographs as well as examples of his work in watercolor, drawing, and sculpture. As an event, it's a turning point in expanding Eakins's reputation; only in recent decades have critics taken note of his efforts beyond painting. Several lengthy and interesting biocritical essays, themselves making up 175 pages of text, separate four sections of color plates. This is clearly the definitive monograph on one of the most significant artists America has produced. Recommended for all libraries. Douglas F. Smith, Oakland P.L., CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This largest and latest publication on Eakins (1844-1916), with its 295 color illustrations and 220 black-and-white illustrations, functions partly as the catalog of an Eakins retrospective that will appear at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. But it is much more than an exhibition catalog. It is, as the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Web site claims, a compendium of all the latest scholarship on Eakins, and "will introduce a new generation of the public to this great painter and key figure in American art." The last full-scale retrospective of the artist's work took place in 1982 (also at the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Since then, a number of unknown works by Eakins have come to light, and a cadre of scholars have been exploring such topics as Eakins's interest in photography and his preoccupation with sports like sailing, rowing, and fishing. This volume contains essays contributed by a host of important Eakins scholars, among them H. Barbara Weinberg, Elizabeth Milroy, Kathleen A. Foster, Marc Simpson, Carol Troyen, and William Innes Homer. Highly recommended. All levels. M. W. Sullivan Villanova University


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