Cover image for Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi
Title:
Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi
Author:
Christiansen, Keith.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art ; New Haven : Yale University Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xx, 476 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
General Note:
Catalog of an exhibition held at the Museo del Palazzo di Venezia, Rome, Oct. 15. 2001-Jan. 6, 2002, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Feb. 14-May 12. 2002, and the St. Louis Art Museum, June 15-Sept. 15, 2002.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781588390066

9781588390073

9780300090772
Format :
Book

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ND623.G366 A4 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

This beautiful book presents the work of these two painters, exploring the artistic development of each, comparing their achievements and showing how both were influenced by their times and the milieus in which they worked.


Summary

This beautiful book presents the work of these two painters, exploring the artistic development of each, comparing their achievements and showing how both were influenced by their times and the milieus in which they worked.


Summary

This beautiful book presents the work of these two painters, exploring the artistic development of each, comparing their achievements and showing how both were influenced by their times and the milieus in which they worked.


Reviews 9

Booklist Review

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653) has been heralded as one of the few famous women painters of her time, but as the expert and articulate contributors to this unprecedented study of both Artemisia and her painter father, Orazio, explain, there's more to her story than is commonly known. Christiansen, curator of Italian paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, launches this beautifully produced and genuinely exciting volume with a fresh look at Orazio's remarkable transformation from a competent but bland painter into a veritable "poet of light" after working with Caravaggio. An "ardent champion" of his talented, ambitious, and motherless daughter, he was also her teacher, but Artemisia quickly established her own style and focus. The most notorious aspect of their saga is Artemisia's rape, or deflowering, by the artist Tassi, a colleague of her father's, and curator Mann and others shed new light on this event, and the equally compelling question of whether Artemisia was the model for female nudes in Orazio's and her own paintings, beginning with her astute and audacious Susanna and the Elders, painted when she was 17. Both artists emerge from these meticulously argued pages as complex and unconventional human beings as well as consummate artists, and their glorious paintings glow with rekindled radiance. Donna Seaman


Library Journal Review

This book, which accompanies an exhibition currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and traveling both to the St. Louis Art Museum and to the Museo di Palazzo di Venezia in Rome, is the first to examine in one volume both Orazio and Artemesia Gentileschi, father-and-daughter artists of 17th-century Italy. The catalog demonstrates that Orazio Gentileschi follows the Caravaggesque practice of painting from the model, which Artemesia in turn absorbed into her own painting methods. At the same time, curator Christiansen concludes that Orazio painted much more in the elegant style of classical painting in France and never accepted the Baroque idioms of drama and expressiveness that his daughter Artemesia wholeheartedly embraced in her painting. Also discussed in this catalog is the feminist aspect of Artemesia's position as a talented woman artist, the possibility that she was the model for her own "Susanna and the Elders" early in her career, and how her social environment and opportunities as a woman artist changed dramatically after her marriage and her move from Rome to Florence. This catalog also includes excellent color reproductions and previously unpublished documents relating to the trial of Orazio's colleague, Agostino Tassi, for raping Artemesia. The scholarly literature on these artists should be advanced considerably by this extremely comprehensive volume. Enthusiastically recommended for all libraries that support programs in art and art history. [Interested readers will also want to look at Susan Vreeland's The Passion of Artemisia, a fictional account of the artists reviewed in LJ 12/01. Ed.] Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

There has been a flood of recent publishing--and advancement of knowledge--in Gentileschi studies, not least of which are two publications dedicated to Artemisia: Mary D. Garrard's Artemisia Gentileschi (CH, Jun'89) and R. Ward Bissell's Artemisia Gentileschi and the Authority of Art (CH, Nov'99). Daughter Artemisia has a respectable claim as the best female artist before Mary Cassatt, and father Orazio, at least her equal. An exhibition was appropriate because the reconstruction, particularly of Artemisia's oeuvre, is fraught with problems. The curators were not only able to disagree amicably on at least one point of attribution, but they bravely admit that in 1979 the Metropolitan sold a painting now attributed to Artemisia. Ten additional authors provide essays on the chronological and geographical phases of both careers. The illustrations are beautiful and plentiful; moreover, they include works not in any venue of the exhibition, such as frescoes by the notorious Agostino Tassi, master of perspective and seducer of Artemisia. A rather fascinating picture of the lowlife of these artists, not yet dignified as bohemian, emerges, as well as the persistent though understated theme of reliance on print sources, particularly by Artemisia, whose early movements were so restricted. Four exceptionally interesting appendixes. An important publication. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. P. Emison University of New Hampshire


Booklist Review

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653) has been heralded as one of the few famous women painters of her time, but as the expert and articulate contributors to this unprecedented study of both Artemisia and her painter father, Orazio, explain, there's more to her story than is commonly known. Christiansen, curator of Italian paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, launches this beautifully produced and genuinely exciting volume with a fresh look at Orazio's remarkable transformation from a competent but bland painter into a veritable "poet of light" after working with Caravaggio. An "ardent champion" of his talented, ambitious, and motherless daughter, he was also her teacher, but Artemisia quickly established her own style and focus. The most notorious aspect of their saga is Artemisia's rape, or deflowering, by the artist Tassi, a colleague of her father's, and curator Mann and others shed new light on this event, and the equally compelling question of whether Artemisia was the model for female nudes in Orazio's and her own paintings, beginning with her astute and audacious Susanna and the Elders, painted when she was 17. Both artists emerge from these meticulously argued pages as complex and unconventional human beings as well as consummate artists, and their glorious paintings glow with rekindled radiance. Donna Seaman


Library Journal Review

This book, which accompanies an exhibition currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and traveling both to the St. Louis Art Museum and to the Museo di Palazzo di Venezia in Rome, is the first to examine in one volume both Orazio and Artemesia Gentileschi, father-and-daughter artists of 17th-century Italy. The catalog demonstrates that Orazio Gentileschi follows the Caravaggesque practice of painting from the model, which Artemesia in turn absorbed into her own painting methods. At the same time, curator Christiansen concludes that Orazio painted much more in the elegant style of classical painting in France and never accepted the Baroque idioms of drama and expressiveness that his daughter Artemesia wholeheartedly embraced in her painting. Also discussed in this catalog is the feminist aspect of Artemesia's position as a talented woman artist, the possibility that she was the model for her own "Susanna and the Elders" early in her career, and how her social environment and opportunities as a woman artist changed dramatically after her marriage and her move from Rome to Florence. This catalog also includes excellent color reproductions and previously unpublished documents relating to the trial of Orazio's colleague, Agostino Tassi, for raping Artemesia. The scholarly literature on these artists should be advanced considerably by this extremely comprehensive volume. Enthusiastically recommended for all libraries that support programs in art and art history. [Interested readers will also want to look at Susan Vreeland's The Passion of Artemisia, a fictional account of the artists reviewed in LJ 12/01. Ed.] Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

There has been a flood of recent publishing--and advancement of knowledge--in Gentileschi studies, not least of which are two publications dedicated to Artemisia: Mary D. Garrard's Artemisia Gentileschi (CH, Jun'89) and R. Ward Bissell's Artemisia Gentileschi and the Authority of Art (CH, Nov'99). Daughter Artemisia has a respectable claim as the best female artist before Mary Cassatt, and father Orazio, at least her equal. An exhibition was appropriate because the reconstruction, particularly of Artemisia's oeuvre, is fraught with problems. The curators were not only able to disagree amicably on at least one point of attribution, but they bravely admit that in 1979 the Metropolitan sold a painting now attributed to Artemisia. Ten additional authors provide essays on the chronological and geographical phases of both careers. The illustrations are beautiful and plentiful; moreover, they include works not in any venue of the exhibition, such as frescoes by the notorious Agostino Tassi, master of perspective and seducer of Artemisia. A rather fascinating picture of the lowlife of these artists, not yet dignified as bohemian, emerges, as well as the persistent though understated theme of reliance on print sources, particularly by Artemisia, whose early movements were so restricted. Four exceptionally interesting appendixes. An important publication. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. P. Emison University of New Hampshire


Booklist Review

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653) has been heralded as one of the few famous women painters of her time, but as the expert and articulate contributors to this unprecedented study of both Artemisia and her painter father, Orazio, explain, there's more to her story than is commonly known. Christiansen, curator of Italian paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, launches this beautifully produced and genuinely exciting volume with a fresh look at Orazio's remarkable transformation from a competent but bland painter into a veritable "poet of light" after working with Caravaggio. An "ardent champion" of his talented, ambitious, and motherless daughter, he was also her teacher, but Artemisia quickly established her own style and focus. The most notorious aspect of their saga is Artemisia's rape, or deflowering, by the artist Tassi, a colleague of her father's, and curator Mann and others shed new light on this event, and the equally compelling question of whether Artemisia was the model for female nudes in Orazio's and her own paintings, beginning with her astute and audacious Susanna and the Elders, painted when she was 17. Both artists emerge from these meticulously argued pages as complex and unconventional human beings as well as consummate artists, and their glorious paintings glow with rekindled radiance. Donna Seaman


Library Journal Review

This book, which accompanies an exhibition currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and traveling both to the St. Louis Art Museum and to the Museo di Palazzo di Venezia in Rome, is the first to examine in one volume both Orazio and Artemesia Gentileschi, father-and-daughter artists of 17th-century Italy. The catalog demonstrates that Orazio Gentileschi follows the Caravaggesque practice of painting from the model, which Artemesia in turn absorbed into her own painting methods. At the same time, curator Christiansen concludes that Orazio painted much more in the elegant style of classical painting in France and never accepted the Baroque idioms of drama and expressiveness that his daughter Artemesia wholeheartedly embraced in her painting. Also discussed in this catalog is the feminist aspect of Artemesia's position as a talented woman artist, the possibility that she was the model for her own "Susanna and the Elders" early in her career, and how her social environment and opportunities as a woman artist changed dramatically after her marriage and her move from Rome to Florence. This catalog also includes excellent color reproductions and previously unpublished documents relating to the trial of Orazio's colleague, Agostino Tassi, for raping Artemesia. The scholarly literature on these artists should be advanced considerably by this extremely comprehensive volume. Enthusiastically recommended for all libraries that support programs in art and art history. [Interested readers will also want to look at Susan Vreeland's The Passion of Artemisia, a fictional account of the artists reviewed in LJ 12/01. Ed.] Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

There has been a flood of recent publishing--and advancement of knowledge--in Gentileschi studies, not least of which are two publications dedicated to Artemisia: Mary D. Garrard's Artemisia Gentileschi (CH, Jun'89) and R. Ward Bissell's Artemisia Gentileschi and the Authority of Art (CH, Nov'99). Daughter Artemisia has a respectable claim as the best female artist before Mary Cassatt, and father Orazio, at least her equal. An exhibition was appropriate because the reconstruction, particularly of Artemisia's oeuvre, is fraught with problems. The curators were not only able to disagree amicably on at least one point of attribution, but they bravely admit that in 1979 the Metropolitan sold a painting now attributed to Artemisia. Ten additional authors provide essays on the chronological and geographical phases of both careers. The illustrations are beautiful and plentiful; moreover, they include works not in any venue of the exhibition, such as frescoes by the notorious Agostino Tassi, master of perspective and seducer of Artemisia. A rather fascinating picture of the lowlife of these artists, not yet dignified as bohemian, emerges, as well as the persistent though understated theme of reliance on print sources, particularly by Artemisia, whose early movements were so restricted. Four exceptionally interesting appendixes. An important publication. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. P. Emison University of New Hampshire