Cover image for Resource rebels : native challenges to mining and oil corporations
Title:
Resource rebels : native challenges to mining and oil corporations
Author:
Gedicks, Al.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, MA : South End Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
viii, 241 pages : maps ; 22 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780896086418

9780896086401
Format :
Book

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GN449.3 .G43 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Native peoples and their allies work to protect the world's remaining natural resources from corporate greed.


Summary

[body]

The greed of mining and oil companies is driving Native peoples to the brink of extinction. Acclaimed scholar of Native and environmental issues Al Gedicks describes how a multiracial, transnational movement is fighting back.

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In Mexico, the Philippines, Colombia, Ecuador, Nigeria, West Papua, Canada, and the United States, indigenous peoples are working with environmentalists and anti-racists to stop corporate and state takeovers of their traditional lands and waters. Al Gedicks looks at these and other regions and documents how mining and oil companies subvert local opposition and rely on military forces to carry out their exploitation.

Global activists will find Resource Rebels an essential key to effective campaigns. As native communities have come under assault, there has been an extraordinary growth of native organizations asserting their rights on the international stage. Gedicks documents how a growing transnational environmental and human rights network has come to the assistance of native communities under siege by the international oil and mining industries.

Praise for The New Resource Wars:

"Useful to all people concerned with sustaining life on this planet."-- The Circle

"Clear and compassionate." -The Progressive"A definitive documentation."- Higher Values: The Minewatch Bulletin

"Exhaustive."-- Toward Freedom

Al Gedicks is a professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and an environmental and native rights activist. He has written extensively about the impact of mining on native populations and is the author of the critically acclaimed classic, The New Resource Wars: Native and Environmental Struggles Against Multinational Corporations (ISBN 0-89608-462-0, South End Press 1993).


Author Notes

Al Gedicks is professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, and a longtime activist in environmental and native solidarity movements


Al Gedicks is professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, and a longtime activist in environmental and native solidarity movements


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Gedicks (sociology, Univ. of Wisconsin, La Crosse) depicts the global scale of the environmental justice movement. Multinational mining and oil corporations have extracted the most easily reached global resources through the simple technologies of strip-mining and pumping. To obtain the rest, the multinationals use advanced technologies to find and extract resources in the more inaccessible parts of the world--mountains, tropical rainforests, tundras, and deserts. Since these lands are already occupied, resource extraction by multinational corporations frequently involves a military presence and the repression of the regions' native peoples. The consequence is massive environmental degradation and widespread human rights violations among indigenous cultures. But in the last two decades, indigenous resistance has been mobilized at local, regional, national, and international levels. The book documents this resistance to exploitation through factually substantiated vignettes of such cases in the US, Nigeria, Columbia, Ecuador, and West Papua. Perhaps the book's greatest strength is its clear, direct writing style, which will potentially carry to a broad readership this important information on the relationships among economic development, environmental degradation, and human rights violations. Extensive bibliography and index. All levels. S. Cable University of Tennessee at Knoxville


Choice Review

Gedicks (sociology, Univ. of Wisconsin, La Crosse) depicts the global scale of the environmental justice movement. Multinational mining and oil corporations have extracted the most easily reached global resources through the simple technologies of strip-mining and pumping. To obtain the rest, the multinationals use advanced technologies to find and extract resources in the more inaccessible parts of the world--mountains, tropical rainforests, tundras, and deserts. Since these lands are already occupied, resource extraction by multinational corporations frequently involves a military presence and the repression of the regions' native peoples. The consequence is massive environmental degradation and widespread human rights violations among indigenous cultures. But in the last two decades, indigenous resistance has been mobilized at local, regional, national, and international levels. The book documents this resistance to exploitation through factually substantiated vignettes of such cases in the US, Nigeria, Columbia, Ecuador, and West Papua. Perhaps the book's greatest strength is its clear, direct writing style, which will potentially carry to a broad readership this important information on the relationships among economic development, environmental degradation, and human rights violations. Extensive bibliography and index. All levels. S. Cable University of Tennessee at Knoxville


Table of Contents

Forewordp. vi
Introduction: A World Out of Balancep. 1
Chapter 1 Scouring the Globep. 15
Chapter 2 Big Oil, the Environment and Human Rightsp. 41
Chapter 3 West Papua: The Freeport/Rio Campaignp. 91
Chapter 4 A Multiracial Anti-Mining Movementp. 127
Chapter 5 Silencing the Voice of the People: How Mining Companies Subvert Local Oppositionp. 159
Chapter 6 The Military, Trade and Strategies for Sustainabilityp. 181
Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 225
Forewordp. vi
Introduction: A World Out of Balancep. 1
Chapter 1 Scouring the Globep. 15
Chapter 2 Big Oil, the Environment and Human Rightsp. 41
Chapter 3 West Papua: The Freeport/Rio Campaignp. 91
Chapter 4 A Multiracial Anti-Mining Movementp. 127
Chapter 5 Silencing the Voice of the People: How Mining Companies Subvert Local Oppositionp. 159
Chapter 6 The Military, Trade and Strategies for Sustainabilityp. 181
Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 225