Cover image for Data broadcasting : merging digital broadcasting with the Internet
Title:
Data broadcasting : merging digital broadcasting with the Internet
Author:
Tvede, Lars, 1957-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Revised edition.
Publication Information:
Chichester [England] ; New York : Wiley, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xvi, 274 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Electronic Access:
Table of Contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/onix07/2001024352.html
ISBN:
9780471485605
Format :
Book

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Central Library HE8689.8 .T93 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A truly groundbreaking volume, this fully revised and updated edition of Data Broadcasting presents an exhaustive overview of the specific data broadcasting and bordering technologies concerned. Answering a wealth of questions, it describes this new technology in detail, examining how it differs from established technologies, and for what means it can be used. It also analyses data broadcasting from the perspectives of both the medium and business.

* Features the latest developments in electronic media
* Discusses the major media opportunities of data broadcasting
* Shows how data broadcasting can overcome many notorious problems resulting from dense traffic on the Internet
* Considers the technical implications of data broadcasting over different network infrastructures
* Examines the process of developing and launching multimedia channels in a data broadcasting environment.

Essential, up to date coverage for executives and developers in the telecommunications, software, hardware and media industries of the main commercial, editorial and technical opportunities of data broadcasting.


Author Notes

LARS TVEDE has co-founded several high-tech companies, including The Fantastic Corporation, which specialises in the development of software for data broadcast. He is co-author of Marketing Strategies for the New Economy and author of Business Cycles - from John Law to the Internet Crash and The Psychology of Finance.

PETER PIRCHER spent two years at the University of California in San Francisco and then, as co-founder and Chief Technical Officer (CTO), he worked at IDE and Aonix, both San Francisco software tools companies. After serving as Vice President of Technology for the ETF Group, in 1998 he joined The Fanatastic Corporation as CTO.

JENS BODENKAMP has worked for the Intel Corporation, where he was most recently responsible for development of the company's broadband strategy and its implementation in Europe. In April 2001 he joined the ETF Group, a venture capital firm headquartered in Switzerland, and is now Managing Director of this company's German subsidiary.


Table of Contents

Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
List of Tablesp. xv
List of Figuresp. xvi
1 The Evolution of Broadcastingp. 1
1.1 The Conception of Electronic Broadcast Mediap. 2
1.1.1 Something in the Airp. 2
1.1.2 The Beginning of Televisionp. 3
1.1.3 The Age of Satellitesp. 4
1.1.4 The Beginning of Cablep. 9
1.1.5 The Emergence of Large TV Empiresp. 12
1.2 The Power of Broadcastingp. 13
2 The Internetp. 15
2.1 The Conception of the Internetp. 15
2.2 Growth and Maturityp. 16
2.3 The Network Effectp. 18
2.4 Increasing Returnsp. 19
2.5 The Future of the Internetp. 20
2.5.1 Ubiquity and Diversityp. 22
2.5.2 Convergence and Embeddingp. 23
2.6 Proportions Between Bandwidth and Memoryp. 24
3 Broadcasting Meets the Internetp. 31
3.1 Data Broadcast: Technical Postitioningp. 31
3.2 Data Broadcast: Ecosystemp. 35
3.3 The Organisation Process in the Value Chainp. 36
4 Technology Framework for Data Broadcasting Environmentsp. 42
4.1 Moving Packages--Old and New Waysp. 42
4.2 Dividing Content into Packagesp. 44
4.3 Choosing a Delivery Typep. 45
4.3.1 Delivery Typesp. 45
4.3.2 Delivery Servicesp. 46
4.3.3 Quality of Service (QoS)p. 48
4.4 Specifying Destination and Guaranteeing a Unique Addressp. 48
4.5 Providing Information about How to Reach the Destinationp. 49
4.5.1 IP Multicastp. 50
4.6 Getting a Vehicle for Transportationp. 53
4.6.1 When IP Gets a Trip Companionp. 55
4.7 Choosing a Physical Pathp. 56
4.7.1 Wireline/Copper Pairp. 58
4.7.2 Wireline/Fibre Opticsp. 59
4.7.3 Cable Televisionp. 59
4.7.4 Digital Terrestrialp. 60
4.7.5 Mobilep. 64
4.7.6 Satellite Distributionp. 69
4.7.7 Home Networksp. 70
4.7.8 Comparing Wireless Local Networking Standardsp. 78
4.8 Reaching the End-Userp. 80
5 The Five Basic Formats of Data Broadcastingp. 81
5.1 Three Key Questions Regarding the Data Broadcasting Contentp. 82
5.1.1 "Guaranteed Delivery" or "Best Effort"?p. 82
5.1.2 Time Critical Delivery?p. 83
5.1.3 Viewing on Delivery?p. 83
5.2 Data Broadcasting Formats--an Overviewp. 83
5.3 Cached Content Deliveryp. 84
5.3.1 Receiving and Deleting Cached Contentp. 85
5.3.2 Scheduling and Broadcasting of Cached Contentp. 93
5.4 Package Deliveryp. 95
5.4.1 Applications, Usage Tracking and Billing of Package Deliveryp. 96
5.4.2 Usage Trackingp. 96
5.5 Audio/Video Streamingp. 106
5.5.1 Typical Applications for Audio/Video Streamingp. 107
5.5.2 Infrastructure requirements for audiolvideo streamingp. 108
5.5.3 Audio Video Stream Event Typep. 109
5.5.4 Booking and scheduling considerations for A/V streamingp. 110
5.6 Data Streamingp. 111
5.6.1 Applications for data streamingp. 111
5.6.2 Granularity of Data Streamsp. 112
5.7 Broadcast Guidesp. 117
5.7.1 The Media Context of the Broadcast Guidep. 118
5.8 Linking Broadcasting Services to the Internetp. 124
5.8.1 The Three-Layered Hybrid Mediump. 124
5.8.2 Creating "Bouncers"p. 125
6 Implementing a Data Broadcasting Platformp. 130
6.1 Factors Determining Basic Platform Requirementsp. 130
6.1.1 The Role of Content Managementp. 132
6.1.2 The Role of Community Administrationp. 132
6.1.3 The Role of Network Administrationp. 132
6.1.4 The Role of Advertising Managementp. 133
6.2 Listing the Basic Functionality Requiredp. 133
6.3 Subscription Managementp. 136
6.4 Data Encryption and Securityp. 136
6.4.1 Encryption and Conditional Access Systemsp. 136
6.5 Scheduling and Bookingp. 137
6.5.1 Features of Scheduling Toolsp. 140
6.5.2 General Criteria of Bandwidth Booking Systemsp. 141
6.5.3 Managing Booking Through a Transmission Chainp. 142
6.6 Billingp. 144
6.7 Reportingp. 144
6.8 Media Object Trackingp. 145
6.8.1 Digital Watermark/Copyright Handlingp. 148
6.9 Intelligent Content Compilingp. 149
6.10 Overall Platform Flexibilityp. 149
6.10.1 Hardware Independencep. 150
6.10.2 Network Independencep. 150
6.10.3 Browser Independencep. 150
7 Data Broadcasting: The Media Opportunitiesp. 151
7.1 Different Kinds of Media Experiencesp. 151
7.2 Users of the Data Broadcasting Mediump. 155
7.2.1 Professional Applicationsp. 157
7.2.2 Consumer Applicationsp. 166
8 Creating Data Broadcasting Applications and Services: 26 Stepsp. 175
8.1 Creation Process Overviewp. 175
8.2 Process Details of the Channel Planning Phasep. 180
8.2.1 Setting the Teamp. 180
8.2.2 Determining the Management Processp. 181
8.2.3 Defining the Vision for the Channelp. 182
8.2.4 Market Researchp. 183
8.2.5 End-user Segmentationp. 185
8.2.6 Target Group Researchp. 185
8.2.7 Channel Marketing Strategyp. 188
8.2.8 Preliminary Implementation Planp. 189
8.2.9 Content Sourcing and Value Propositionp. 189
8.2.10 Preliminary Commercial Reviewp. 190
8.2.11 Lists of Deliverablesp. 190
8.2.12 Resources and Cost Estimatep. 191
8.2.13 Content Exploration and Analysisp. 191
8.2.14 Initial Design Specificationp. 192
8.2.15 Channel Operations and Maintenance Planp. 193
8.2.16 Complete Design and Functionality Specificationp. 196
8.3 Process Details of the Channel Implementation Phasep. 197
8.3.1 Internal Testp. 198
8.3.2 User Testp. 199
8.3.3 Technical Alpha Testp. 201
8.3.4 Technical Beta Testp. 201
8.4 Process Details of the Channel Launch Phasep. 201
8.4.1 Channel Packagingp. 201
8.4.2 Channel Sign-offp. 202
8.4.3 Channel Releasep. 202
8.4.4 Channel Acceptancep. 202
9 Operating Networks of Multiple Data Broadcasting Channelsp. 203
9.1 Editorial Issues for Multi-Channel Network Operationp. 203
9.1.1 Multi-Channel Schedulingp. 203
9.1.2 Broadcast Guide and Information Channel Operationsp. 205
9.1.3 Electronic Tutorialp. 207
9.1.4 Test Channelp. 207
9.2 Technical Issues for Multi-Channel Operationp. 207
9.2.1 Providing a Basic Channel Operations Infrastructurep. 207
9.2.2 Data Gathering and Processing Proceduresp. 208
9.2.3 Backbone Transporation Networkp. 209
9.2.4 Data On-Rampingp. 210
9.2.5 Client Software Deploymentp. 210
9.2.6 Delivering the Initial Installation Softwarep. 211
9.2.7 Following Up with Software Upgradesp. 212
9.2.8 Incident/RFD Handlingp. 212
9.3 Commercial Issues for Multi-Channel Operationp. 213
9.3.1 Product Policy for the Channel Networkp. 213
9.3.2 Support Infrastructurep. 215
9.3.3 Media Object Trackingp. 216
9.3.4 Subscription Managementp. 216
9.3.5 Channel Network Marketing Controlp. 216
10 The Commercial Drivers Behind Data Broadcastingp. 218
10.1 How Value Flows Through the Value Chainp. 219
10.2 Sharing the Added Value Throughout the Value Chainp. 221
10.2.1 Value for Basic Core Technology Enablersp. 221
10.2.2 Value for Basic Commercial Enablersp. 223
10.2.3 Value for Early Adoptersp. 238
10.2.4 Value in the Growth and Maturity Phasep. 240
11 Data Broadcasting in the Futurep. 242
12 Glossary of Termsp. 246
Indexp. 255

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