Cover image for Room on the broom
Title:
Room on the broom
Author:
Donaldson, Julia.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 x 29 cm
Summary:
A witch finds room on her broom for all the animals that ask for a ride, and they repay her kindness by rescuing her from a dragon.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 720 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 61672.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.2 1 Quiz: 40490.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803726574
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Newstead Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Work Room
Searching...
Boston Free Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Concord Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Eden Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Hamburg Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
Searching...
Marilla Free Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Williamsville Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Williamsville Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
Searching...
Anna M. Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
Searching...
Clarence Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Holiday
Searching...
Frank E. Merriweather Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
Searching...
Grand Island Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Orchard Park Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The witch and her cat couldn't be happier, flying through the sky on their broomstick-until the witch drops her hat, then her bow, then her wand! Luckily, three helpful animals find the missing items and all they want in return is a ride on the broomstick. But is there room on the broom for so many new friends? And when disaster strikes, will they be able to save the witch from the clutches of a hungry dragon?

From the acclaimed creators of The Gruffalo , this enchanting story of quick wits and friendship is full of humor and adventure-and just the right amount of spookiness.


Author Notes

Julia Catherine Donaldson was born on Sept. 16, 1948 in London. She is a British writer and playwright and the 2011-2013 Children's Laureate. She is known for her rhyming stories for children. These include: The Gruffalo, Room on the Broom and Stick Man. She began writing songs for children's television but has focused on writing books when the words of one of her songs - A Squash and a Squeeze were made into a children's book in 1993. She has over 180 published works with 120 of them intended for school use and include her Songbirds phonic reading scheme, which is part of the Oxfird Reading Tree.

She has won several awards including: The Stockport Book Award for her title The Troll, The Oxfordshire Book Award for her title Zog and The Oldham Book Award for her title Jack and the Flumflum Tree. In 2015 The Gruffalo made The New Zealand Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. Here's a winsome witch: she has a huge nose with a wart but a friendly smile, and her long ginger hair is tied in a polka-dot bow. The wind blows her witch's hat off, and a dog brings it to her and asks if there is room on the broom "for a dog like me." Off they go, but the wind takes the bow in her braid; it is brought back by a green bird, who also asks if there is room on the broom. A storm wrests away the witch's wand; a frog returns it and clambers aboard, too. The witch's broomstick breaks, and she is captured and about to be turned into a dragon's supper, when she is rescued by a four-headed, feathered, and furred monstrous creature. The "monster" is, of course, the witch's new companions and her cat, all ready to help a friend. The rhythm and rhyme are lively and quick, and the pictures partake equally of silly and spooky. The bright red, toothy dragon is particularly impressive. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this lightweight, witty story, helpful animals find "room on the broom" of a generous witch. At first, a striped cat accompanies the cheerful sorceress: "How the cat purred/ and how the witch grinned,/ As they sat on their broomstick/ and flew through the wind." Next, a spotted dog retrieves the witch's flyaway black hat and asks to come aboard. The three riders soon welcome a green parrot (who finds the witch's lost hair ribbon) and a frog (who rescues her wand from the bottom of a pond). When threatened by a dragon, the loyal animals form a "Brementown Musicians" chimera whose "terrible voice,/ when it started to speak,/ was a yowl and a growl/ and a croak and a shriek." The witch repays them by conjuring a cushier vehicle. Donaldson and Scheffler, previously paired for The Gruffalo, emphasize the airborne animals' contentment and evoke sympathy for the broom's driver. In Scheffler's comical panels and insets, the witch has a warty nose and lace-up boots, but wears a pleasant smile; Donaldson puts a spooky/silly spin on the folktale format. The metrical rhyme and goofy suspense aren't groundbreaking, but readers will likely find it refreshing to see a witch playing against type. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-A witch and her cat pick up a dog, a bird, and a frog, and fly off on her broomstick. The frog jumps for joy, the broomstick snaps in two, the animals land in a bog, and a dragon captures the witch. What to do? As in the Grimms' "The Bremen Town Musicians," the animals, covered in mud, stand on each other and "yowl," "growl," "croak," and "shriek," scaring the dragon and saving the witch. All's well that ends well for the witch conjures up a super broom with seats for the cat and dog, a nest for the bird, and a pool for the frog. The story is in rhyme, bouncing merrily along, full of fun, and not at all scary. The illustrations are witty and wonderful. All the characters, even the dragon, have the same goofy grin and large, round eyes. Dressed in a purple skirt, red blouse, and black cape and hat, the witch, with a long, ginger braid, is more friendly than frightening. The image of the red dragon carrying her, passed out cold, is a hoot. And her cat is not the traditional black cat; it looks more like a baby tiger. The result is a surefire read-aloud hit.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview