Cover image for Up country
Title:
Up country
Author:
DeMille, Nelson.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Time Warner AudioBooks, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
8 audio discs (approximately 9 hrs.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Abridged by Kim Gruenenfelder Smith ; text edited by William Whittington.
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9781586211356
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

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Material Type
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Lancaster Library XX(1134712.52) Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Grand Island Library XX(1134712.54) Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Audubon Library XX(1134712.60) Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Hamburg Library XX(1134712.62) Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

Army investigator, Paul Brenner, returns. When an old friend calls in a career's worth of favours, Paul finds himself moonlighting for the Army as he investigates a murder that took place 30 years before, in the midst of the Vietnam war.


Author Notes

Nelson DeMille was born in New York City on August 23, 1943. He attended Hofstra University for three years, then joined the Army and went to Officer Candidate School. He was commissioned a First Lieutenant and served in Vietnam as an infantry platoon leader with the First Calvary Division. He received the Air Medal, Bronze Star, and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry while in the service. He eventually returned to Hofstra University and received a degree in political science and history.

His first writings were NYPD detective novels, but his first major novel, By the Rivers of Babylon, was published in 1978. His other works include Cathedral, The Talbot Odyssey, Word of Honor, The Gold Coast, The General's Daughter, Spencerville, Plum Island, The Lion's Game, Up Country, Night Fall, Wild Fire, and The Quest. His New York Times bestsellers include Radient Angel and The Cuban Affair.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Retired warrant officer Paul Brenner, last seen in The General's Daughter (1992), is asked by his former boss in the U.S. Army's Criminal Investigation Division to go to Vietnam to find Tran Van Vinh, a North Vietnamese soldier who witnessed the murder of one American by another. Paul senses an ulterior motive for his mission: Why would the army care about a 30-year-old crime? Having served two tours in Vietnam in 1968 and 1972, Paul can't believe he's volunteering to go back a third time. His first contact in Hanoi is Susan Weber, an expat who's a banker by day but who dreams of living more adventurously by night. Bright, well versed in local customs, and fluent in Vietnamese, Susan convinces Paul to take her along as he attempts to find Vinh. Following a circuitous path as it becomes clear that there is much more at stake than a cold murder case, Paul struggles to sort out the good guys from the bad while simultaneously dealing with his Vietnam memories of brutal, unspeakable acts of war, some at his own hands. DeMille's portrayal of the cocky soldier returning to enemy soil is moving and realistic, peppered with Paul's recollections of the war and the people who must live with its legacy every day. Neither pro-nor anti-war, this poignant story from the wildly popular DeMille is particularly timely in light of today's international situation. --Mary Frances Wilkens


Publisher's Weekly Review

That DeMille has written a sequel to The General's Daughter comes as no surprise; after all, that's arguably his best-known novel because of the hit film version starring John Travolta. Nor is it surprising that he's set this sequel in Vietnam; returning hero Chief Warrant Officer Paul Brenner, Ret., served two stints there during the war, and DeMille himself not only saw action in Nam but returned in 1997 for an extended visit. What is curious, and relatively unfortunate, is that the long narrative focuses so much on travelogue instead of intrigue and action; it's as if DeMille, a wickedly fine thriller writer, has been possessed by the soul of James Michener. Still, the overarching story line captivates, as Brenner agrees to return to Vietnam to track down a Vietnamese witness to a 30-year-old unprosecuted crime, in which a U.S. Army captain murdered an army lieutenant and plundered some treasure. Joined by beautiful Susan Weber, who says she's an American expat businesswoman doing a favor for the U.S. government, Brenner travels to the little village where the witness may still live; along the way, the pair flirt, sightsee, visit a nude beach, sightsee, have sex, sightsee, and talk a lot. The sightseeing carries serious emotional impact as Brenner processes his wartime past and Vietnam's present, and it carries serious risk, as Colonel Mang of the secret police tracks Brenner's and Susan's movements. There's some violence as the two Americans elude Mang and his minions, and a melodramatic finale as Brenner realizes just who the murderous captain now is, and some dramatic suspense as Brenner peels away layers of Susan's identity covers. And then there's blasted, resilient Vietnam, which DeMille captures expertly, in all its anguished pride. With a film version in development at Paramount and the Warner publicity machine working at top gear, expect this engrossing but not exceptional novel to shoot to the top. 15-city author tour. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

In DeMille's latest, Paul Brenner is drug back into the army's Criminal Investigative Division to check out a murder committed 30 years ago in Vietnam. People probably won't have to be drug into the theaters to see the film version, due out from Paramount with John Travolta possibly reprising the role of Paul Brenner, whom he played in The General's Daughter. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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