Cover image for The measure of the world : a novel
Title:
The measure of the world : a novel
Author:
Guedj, Denis.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Mesure du monde. English
Publication Information:
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xi, 298 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780226310305
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

On June 24, 1792, two large traveling coaches left the Tuileries, one for Dunkirk and the other for Barcelona. Their passengers, Pierre Méchain and Jean-Baptiste Delambre, were astronomers charged by the French Revolutionary government with the task of measuring the meridian that passes through these two cities in order to devise one universal unit of measure, "for all time and for all men," the meter.

The Measure of the World by Denis Guedj tells the story of this strange and wonderful effort. Not a traditional history of science, the book is a novelistic account of the measurement project that relies heavily on archival sources. A more "traditional" history could not possibly describe how a sober scientific enterprise could turn into a journey filled with adventures and experiences so bizarre as to be hardly credible. In the tumultuous days of revolutionary and postrevolutionary France, Méchain and Delambre were objects of suspicion as they traveled through the provinces, climbing steeples and deploying strange instrumentsthey were detained as spies, taken for charlatans or fleeing royalists, and arrested for debt. Their perilous labors lasted until 1799, when the meter was formally established.

Arthur Goldhammer's crisp translation of this wonderful novel retains the flavor of the original, and an appendix explaining Guedj's use of historical materials is included. A vivid re-creation of a fascinating and troubling period in history juxtaposed with the achievement of a complicated scientific undertaking, The Measure of the World is a marvelous book-not science fiction, but fiction about science.

Denis Guedj is the author of La évolution des savants and L'Empire des nombres , among other books. La Mesure du monde was awarded the Prix d'Institut in 1989. Arthur Goldhammer is an award-winning translator who has translated works by Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Jacques Le Goff, and Jean Starobinski.


Author Notes

Denis Guedj is the author of La Révolution des savants and L'Empire des nombres , among other books. La Mesure du monde was awarded the Prix d'Institut in 1989. Arthur Goldhammer is an award-winning translator who has translated works by Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Jacques Le Goff, and Jean Starobinski.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Guedj states in the preface that he has long been fascinated by the quest to determine a standard for the base unit of length--the meter. He has chosen to present the story as a novel but one populated by many real-life personages. Foremost among these are Jean-Baptiste Delambre (1749-1822) and Pierre Mechain (1744-1804), eminent astronomers appointed by the French Academy in 1792 to survey the meridian from Dunkirk to Barcelona. Delambre is assigned the northern part, while Mechain heads south toward Spain. But historical events--in particular the French Revolution--interrupt the project. Regimes topple and buildings chosen as survey stations are blown up. In the face of so many obstacles, it is amazing that the work continued at all, but the survey was finally completed in 1799 and formed the basis for the establishment of the standard meter. Occasionally the fictional inventions impede rather than enhance the drama, but this book will be of particular interest to readers who enjoyed Dava Sobel's nonfiction Longitude (1995). --Mary Ellen Quinn