Cover image for Ancient African civilizations : Kush and Axum
Title:
Ancient African civilizations : Kush and Axum
Author:
Burstein, Stanley Mayer.
Publication Information:
Princeton : Markus Wiener Publishers, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
vii, 166 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781558761476
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DT159.6.N83 A53 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Stanley Burstein has researched, compiled, and translated with commentary the most significant Greek and Roman sources concerning black Africa. The result is this work about the people of the southern part of the Nile Valley, the gold mines of Nubia, the Hellenistic city of Meroe, capital of the Ethiopian Empire of Kush with its own highly developed culture (300 BC to 300 AD). Burstein opens the volume with a brief survey of the two kingdoms of Kush and Axum. With introductions and notes he then presents the ancient literary and epigraphical testimony for this region.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

The ancient kingdoms of Kush (third century BCE to the fourth century CE, with earlier traces) and Axum (fourth century CE to the seventh century CE) developed in what is today the Sudan (or ancient Aithiopia). Originally these kingdoms were reflections of ancient Egypt to the north, but with the collapse of Egypt, Kush flourished and then gave way to Axum. Scholarly interest in these two essentially unknown kingdoms has waxed greatly in the past three decades, with special museum exhibits and permanent installations, as interest in inland Africa has developed with marked significance. Burstein opens the volume with a brief survey of the two kingdoms; with introductions and important notes he then presents the ancient literary and epigraphical testimony for this region. As he cautiously notes, a true history cannot be written, but it is important for scholars to know of the kingdoms and their development. Although this is an important contribution to black Africa, Burstein should have noted that ancient testimony raises questions as to its historical accuracy. Students may be blindly led to believe verbatim those ancient texts. A brief bibliography and photographs aid this significant volume. All levels. J. M. Balcer Ohio State University


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