Cover image for Wisdom of Buddha : the Saṁdhinirmocana Sūtra
Title:
Wisdom of Buddha : the Saṁdhinirmocana Sūtra
Author:
Powers, John, 1957-
Uniform Title:
Tripiṭaka. Sūtrapiṭaka. Saṃdhinirmocanasūtra. English.
Publication Information:
Berkeley, CA : Dharma Pub., [1995]

©1995
Physical Description:
xxii, 397 pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780898002478

9780898002461
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BQ2092 .E5 1995 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This is the Elucidation of the Intention Sutra, or the Sutra Unravelling the Thought (of the Buddha).


Summary

This is the Elucidation of the Intention Sutra, or the Sutra Unravelling the Thought (of the Buddha).


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

Buddhist scholars everywhere should rejoice. This is the first full translation of the Samdhinirmocana Sutra, an important exposition on the nature of existence attributed to the Buddha. This sutra is one of the primary texts of Yogacara, a branch of Mahayana Buddhism. Powers has wisely reproduced the Tibetan text from which he translates on the facing page to aid scholars. Sutras, like all religious tracts, are difficult to read, especially for those unfamiliar with the theological foundation of this form of Buddhism. Luckily for the scholar, the translator has heavily footnoted the more arcane passages and includes a useful bibliography. After reading the text, one wishes that a more comprehensive introduction of Yogacara was included with the translation, but this is a minor criticism of an important addition to the study of Buddhism. Recommended for theological and academic libraries.-Glenn Masuchika, Chaminade Univ. Lib., Honolulu (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This is an annotated English translation of the Samdhinirmocana S=utra, an important Indian Mah=ay=ana text, which was translated into French by 'Etienne Lamotte in 1935. The s=utra is important for its expositions of a number of key points of Buddhist doctrine, including the "three natures" of the Yog=ac=ara school, the meditative practices of quiescence (s'amatha) and insight (vipasyan=a), and, most famously, the three turnings of the wheel of the dharma in which the Buddha taught different philosophical positions at different points in his career, providing his final position here. The last turning has been key to the development of Buddhist hermeneutics in Tibet. The translation is accurate, with notes provided to explicate technical terms and enumerate the contents of lists. The subject matter of the work is often technical, such that the book will be difficult for a general audience. The lack of full scholarly apparatus will make it less useful to specialists than it could have been, although it contains a useful bibliography. The book is beautifully produced, with the sDe-dge edition of the Tibetan text reproduced on facing pages of the translation and illustrations preceding each chapter. Graduate; faculty. D. S. Lopez Jr.; University of Michigan


Library Journal Review

Buddhist scholars everywhere should rejoice. This is the first full translation of the Samdhinirmocana Sutra, an important exposition on the nature of existence attributed to the Buddha. This sutra is one of the primary texts of Yogacara, a branch of Mahayana Buddhism. Powers has wisely reproduced the Tibetan text from which he translates on the facing page to aid scholars. Sutras, like all religious tracts, are difficult to read, especially for those unfamiliar with the theological foundation of this form of Buddhism. Luckily for the scholar, the translator has heavily footnoted the more arcane passages and includes a useful bibliography. After reading the text, one wishes that a more comprehensive introduction of Yogacara was included with the translation, but this is a minor criticism of an important addition to the study of Buddhism. Recommended for theological and academic libraries.-Glenn Masuchika, Chaminade Univ. Lib., Honolulu (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This is an annotated English translation of the Samdhinirmocana S=utra, an important Indian Mah=ay=ana text, which was translated into French by 'Etienne Lamotte in 1935. The s=utra is important for its expositions of a number of key points of Buddhist doctrine, including the "three natures" of the Yog=ac=ara school, the meditative practices of quiescence (s'amatha) and insight (vipasyan=a), and, most famously, the three turnings of the wheel of the dharma in which the Buddha taught different philosophical positions at different points in his career, providing his final position here. The last turning has been key to the development of Buddhist hermeneutics in Tibet. The translation is accurate, with notes provided to explicate technical terms and enumerate the contents of lists. The subject matter of the work is often technical, such that the book will be difficult for a general audience. The lack of full scholarly apparatus will make it less useful to specialists than it could have been, although it contains a useful bibliography. The book is beautifully produced, with the sDe-dge edition of the Tibetan text reproduced on facing pages of the translation and illustrations preceding each chapter. Graduate; faculty. D. S. Lopez Jr.; University of Michigan


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