Cover image for Gimme shelter
Title:
Gimme shelter
Author:
Maysles, David.
Edition:
Uncensored thirtieth Anniversary version, remastered and restored.
Publication Information:
[Place of publication not identified] : Criterion Collection, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (91 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
A documentary of the Rolling Stones' 1969 tour of the United States, focusing on a free concert at the Altamont Speedway in California where a young man was killed during violence between the crowd and the Hell's Angels hired to "keep order." A disturbing portrait of one aspect of the rock and drug culture of the late 60's.
General Note:
Videodisc release of the 1969 concert film.

Special features: Never-before-seen performances of the Rolling Stones at Madison Square Garden in 1969; audio commentary by directors Albert Maysles, Charlotte Zwerin, and collaborator Stanley Goldstein; excerpts from KSAN Radio's Altamont wrap-up; original and re-release theatrical trailers; filmographies for Maysles Films; restoration demonstration.
Language:
English
Contents:
The Rolling Stones: Jumping Jack Flash -- (I can't get no) Satisfaction -- You gotta move -- Wild horses -- Brown sugar -- Love in vain. Tina Turner: I've been loving you too long. The Rolling Stones: Honky tonk women -- Street fighting man. The Flying Burrito Bros.: Six days on the road. Jefferson Airplane: The other side of this life. The Rolling Stones: Sympathy for the Devil -- Under my thumb -- Street fighting man -- Gimme shelter.
ISBN:
9780780023819
UPC:
037429154526
Format :
DVD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
DVD 1172 Adult DVD Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
M1741.18.R65 G566 2000 Adult DVD Classics
Searching...
Searching...
DVD 1172 Adult DVD Audio Visual
Searching...
Searching...
M1741.18.R65 Adult DVD Audio Visual
Searching...
Searching...
DVD 1172 Adult DVD Audio Visual
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

This musical documentary concerns the Rolling Stones and their tragic free concert at Altamont Speedway near San Francisco in early December 1969. The event was all but destroyed by violence that marked the end of the peace and love euphoria of the 1960s. The night began smoothly, with the supercharged Flying Burrito Brothers opening up for the Rolling Stones and performing the truck-driving classic "Six Days on the Road" and Tina Turner giving a sensually charged performance. But on this particular evening, the Stones made the fateful (and disastrous) decision to hire the Oakland chapter of the Hell's Angels motorcycle gang as bodyguards and bouncers. It was a foolhardy, careless choice that turned the night into an unmitigated disaster; halfway through the Stones' act, the Angels killed one black spectator, and injured several others who were present (including Jefferson Airplane's lead singer Marty Balin). In the film, we watch Mick Jagger -- ere an ebullient, charismatic performer of bisexual charm -- reduced to standing on stage like a frightened child with his finger in his mouth in wake of the violence. Unsurprisingly, the Grateful Dead refused to perform after the violence erupted; the picture ends on a despairing note, with the Stones repeatedly watching a film of the murder. Celebrated documentarians Albert and David Maysles directed and Haskell Wexler shot the film, with heightened instinct and control; as a result, this film is considered one of the greatest rock documentaries ever made. Stones songs performed include "Brown Sugar," "Under My Thumb," and "Sympathy for the Devil." ~ Dan Pavlides, Rovi