Cover image for Hatshepsut, his majesty, herself
Title:
Hatshepsut, his majesty, herself
Author:
Andronik, Catherine M.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
40 pages ; color illustrations, color map ; 26 cm
Summary:
A picture book biography of Hatshepsut, a queen in ancient Egypt who declared herself king and ruled as such for more than twenty years.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1080 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.7 1.0 51217.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 7.3 4 Quiz: 25386 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780689825620
Format :
Book

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DT87.15 .A53 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DT87.15 .A53 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DT87.15 .A53 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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DT87.15 .A53 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DT87.15 .A53 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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DT87.15 .A53 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

MEET HATSHEPSUT, PHAROAH OF EGYPT Here is an engaging and informative picture-book biography, lushly illustrated by award-winning artist Joseph Daniel Fiedler, of Egypt's only successful female pharaoh. Hatshepsut gained Egypt's throne when all her male siblings -- including the half brother whom she married -- died. Originally named regent to her nephew, Tuthmosis III, Hatshepsut gradually assumed more and more power, and eventually had herself crowned pharaoh. Since no word existed for a female ruler, Hatshepsut used the male title. She also wore men's clothing and a beard, and referred to herself as "he" as well as "she." Hatshepsut's reign was a peaceful and prosperous one. She sent an expedition to explore Punt, an exotic land of riches, and built beautiful monuments, including a magnificent temple on which she had artists carve and paint scenes from her life and reign. Following her death, Tuthmosis III tried to erase evidence of Hatshepsut's reign to make it seem as though he had succeeded his father directly. Catherine M. Andronik explains how, despite this vandalism, archaeologists have been able to piece together the story of this unconventional pharaoh's remarkable and mysterious life.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

(It is Booklist policy that a book written or edited by a staff member or contributing reviewer receive a brief description rather than a recommending review.) In this picture book for middle readers, Andronik gives children a glimpse of the reign of Egypt's Queen Hatshepsut, setting the biography squarely within the context of ancient Egyptian civilization. Full-color paintings by Joseph Daniel Fiedler, including many double spreads, accompany the text. --Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

Andronik (Quest for a King: Searching for the Real King Arthur) pieces together a thoughtful biography of "ancient Egypt's only successful female king," who ruled in the 1400s B.C. The heavy amount of text and sophisticated discussion of lineage and royal customs make this picture book best suited to older readers. After the death of her father, Tuthmosis I, a powerful pharaoh, 12-year-old Hatshepsut married her only surviving sibling, half-brother Tuthmosis II, who died within several years. Hatshepsut then became the acting ruler of Egypt, allegedly until Tuthmosis's son (by a member of his harem) reached an age to assume this role. Yet she soon thereafter crowns herself pharaoh. Andronik discloses some intriguing anecdotes and details, among them the facts that Hatshepsut referred to herself in her writing as both "he" and "she," and dressed in male clothing at official ceremonies, even attaching a gold "beard" to her chin. After her death, Hatshepsut's nephew (Tuthmosis III) and successor changed the royal records to make it appear as though he had succeeded his father directly and ordered statues and wall carvings bearing her image destroyed. Carefully mingling fact and well-reasoned conjecture, the author shapes an absorbing story, helpfully including pronunciation keys throughout the text. Rendered in alkyd on paper, Fiedler's (The Crystal Heart) stately pictures emulate the feel of ancient Egyptian artwork and make this historical figure all the more real and intriguing. Ages 7-10. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-A readable and appealing picture-book biography of Egypt's only female pharaoh. Initially the regent for her nephew, Tuthmosis III, Hatshepsut gained control and took over the throne when he was still a child. She declared herself ruler, and wore men's clothing and an artificial beard. She used the title of pharaoh and referred to herself as she and he. Her reign was one of peace and prosperity and although she did much to improve her country, Tuthmosis tried to obliterate all traces of her existence after her death. Historians have found enough evidence to document her life, however, and the mystery monarch comes to life in this well-written, intriguing book. Andronik's factual style is peppered with anecdotes and personal tidbits that make Hatshepsut's story a memorable one. Fiedler's rich-toned alkyd paintings fill single- and double-page spreads with stylized renderings of Egyptian life, artwork, and scenery. Text and pictures work together to offer a complete and detailed life story. This fine biography provides some answers to an ancient puzzle.-Beth Tegart, Oneida City Schools, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.