Cover image for Gunman's rhapsody
Title:
Gunman's rhapsody
Author:
Parker, Robert B., 1932-2010.
Publication Information:
New York : Putnam's, 2001.
Physical Description:
289 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780399147623
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Library
Searching...
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Newstead Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...
Clarence Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Collins Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
East Aurora Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Eggertsville-Snyder Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Elma Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...
Grand Island Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Hamburg Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...
Kenilworth Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Lackawanna Library X Adult Fiction Being fixed/mended
Searching...
Lake Shore Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...
Lancaster Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Marilla Free Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...
North Collins Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Orchard Park Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...
Orchard Park Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Audubon Library X Adult Fiction Western
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

A novel of the Old West, imagined as only Robert B. Parker can. "He already had a history by the time he first saw her...he was already a figure of the dime novels, and he already half-believed in the myth of the gunman that he was creating, even as it created him." Robert B. Parker, the undisputed dean of American crime fiction, has long been credited with single-handedly resuscitating the private-eye genre. As the creator of the Spenser, Jesse Stone, and Sunny Randall series, he has proven, again and again, that he is "Boston's peerless man of mystery" (Entertainment Weekly). Now he gives his fans the book he always longed to write-a brilliant and evocative novel set against the hardscrabble frontier life of the West, featuring Wyatt Earp. It is the winter of 1879, and Dodge City has lost its snap. Thirty-one-year-old Wyatt Earp, assistant city marshal, loads his wife and all they own into a wagon, and goes with two of his brothers and their women to Tombstone, Arizona, land of the silver mines. There Earp becomes deputy sheriff, meeting up with the likes of Doc Holliday, Clay Allison, and Bat Masterson and encountering the love of his life, showgirl Josie Marcus. While navigating the constantly shifting alliances of a largely lawless territory, Earp finds himself embroiled in a simmering feud with Johnny Behan, which ultimately erupts in a deadly gunbattle on a dusty street. Here is the master's take on the hallowed Western, as expertly crafted as the Spenser novels, and with the full weight of American history behind it.


Author Notes

Robert Brown Parker was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on September 17, 1932. He received a B.A. from Colby College in 1954, served in the U.S. Army in Korea, and then returned to receive a M. A. in English literature from Boston University in 1957. He received a Ph.D. in English literature from Boston University in 1971.

Before becoming a full-time writer in 1979, he taught at Lowell State College, Bridgewater State College and Northwestern University.

In 1971, Parker published The Godwuff Manuscript, as homage to Raymond Chandler. The character he created, Spencer, became his own detective and was featured in more than 30 novels. His Spencer character has been featured in six TV movies and the television series Spencer: For Hire that starred Robert Urich and ran from 1985 to 1988.

He is also the author of the Jesse Stone series, which has been made into a series of television movies for CBS, and the Sunny Randall series. His novel Appaloosa (2005) was made into a 2008 movie directed by and starring Ed Harris. He has received numerous awards for his work including an Edgar Award for Best Novel in 1977 for The Promised Land, Grand Master Edgar Award for his collective oeuvre in 2002, and the Gumshoe Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008. He died of a heart attack on January 18, 2010 at the age of 77.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

In 1879, the Earp bothers, Wyatt, Virgil, and Morgan, moved to Tombstone, Arizona, to seek their fortune. Shortly after arriving, Wyatt saw a traveling play. One of the lesser players was Josie Marcus. Later, when she returns to Tombstone on the arm of one of Wyatt's political rivals, Johnny Behan, the events are set in motion that culminate with the most famous gun battle in the Old West, the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Parker, best known for his Spenser detective novels (really modern westerns set in Boston), settles seamlessly into this classic western story of a fearless man and the woman who captures his eternal soul. Readers who have enjoyed Elmore Leonard's early westerns or even his more recent Cuba Libre will relish this similar effort. Wyatt Earp is Spenser with spurs, and the supporting characters all have alter egos in Spenser's Boston. The theme of hard, violent men in conflict over love and their own codes of honor is standard Parker fare, but no one does it better. --Wes Lukowsky


Publisher's Weekly Review

The gunman is Wyatt Earp. The rhapsody plays out in a rare Parker stand-alone novel, his best yet and his first western. Told in prose as cool and spare as Parker has ever laid down, the book details the time Wyatt and his brothers spend in Tombstone, culminating in the shootout at the O.K. Corral. Parker's Wyatt won't surprise those familiar with the author's Boston PI, Spenser, and with Spenser's sidekick, Hawk. This Wyatt Earp carries traits of both Spenser's adherence to code, his word, himself, and Hawk's indifference to violence and death. But Wyatt is even more of a distillation than either Spenser or Hawk. He's the essence of the self-contained gunman; as he walks to the O.K., "he could feel the steady rhythm of his pulse, the easy flow of his blood." Events span years, but move quickly. Conflict arises when Wyatt falls hard for beautiful showgirl Josie Marcus and she for him, for she's the lover of local politico Johnny Behan. Johnny's jealousy leads to conspiracy, acts of cowardice and finally to the shoot-out. All the western legends associated with Wyatt play their parts the other Earp brothers, Doc Holliday, Bat Masterson, Clay Allison, John Ringo and Parker etches each in granite. "Are you ready to die today?" Doc asks a man who's insulted him. Occasionally, Parker intersperses the drama with reports (letters, news bulletins, notices) that add historical context though not much more; their inclusion is questionable. What's not is how, as events move toward their necessary conclusion, the narrative takes on the inexorability of classic tragedy. This is a remarkably artful western, as tough and as true as the slap of gunmetal against leather. (June) Forecast: Parker's name on the cover and strong reviews could push this western onto bestseller lists, but it won't sell quite as well as the Spenser titles, with their vast built-in readership. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Parker heads west to meet Wyatt Earp. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview