Cover image for Getting your life back : the complete guide to recovery from depression
Title:
Getting your life back : the complete guide to recovery from depression
Author:
Wright, Jesse H.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Free Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xiv, 381 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780743200493
Format :
Book

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Central Library RC537 .W744 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Kenmore Library RC537 .W744 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Riverside Branch Library RC537 .W744 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library RC537 .W744 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library RC537 .W744 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library RC537 .W744 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

A comprehensive program for overcoming depression using numerous case studies to show readers how to overcome this common disease.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Reading this self-help book is a little like getting a lecture on depression from a friend who cares, but has never endured the illness herself. The authors list five "keys" to understanding and alleviating depression: thinking; taking action; addressing one's biology, relationships and spirit. Each section of the book is devoted to an explanation of how each key plays into depression and written exercises for understanding its role in one's illness. Although the idea of a methodical, step-by-step approach to eliminating depression is appealing, not much here is new or inspiring, and the authors' tone is alternately condescending and chirpy. For example, they advise readers to "try not to get down on yourself"; to "try to lighten up a bit and look for a vein of humor in your situation"; that "the only real way to know whether you can solve a problem is to give it a try"; and that "having questions about your antidepressant therapy is a good sign." Additionally, some of the writing is careless. In a section called, "How not to vent your emotions," the authors suggest, "Don't argue with a cop or your mother-in-law." What about your spouse? The most valuable passages are the stories of specific patients and how they struggled with the illness. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Cognitive behavioral therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts and our interpretations of events greatly influence our moods. Therapists teach clients to listen to their negative internal dialogs and to use less depressive "self-talk." Clients may also be given "homework" in the form of relaxation exercises for anxiety or gradual acclimatization to frightening situations. The emphasis is on changing thoughts and actions, not on understanding their origins. Getting Your Life Back and Self-Coaching are both based on this approach. The latter, by clinical psychologist Luciani, advises readers to identify themselves as specific personality types (e.g., "Worrywarts," "Hedgehogs," "Perfectionists") and then gives specific instructions on how to change these thought patterns. The title by Wright and Basco, a psychiatrist/educator and a clinical psychologist/researcher, respectively, examines various psychological areas (e.g., thinking, action, biology, relationships, and spirituality) and invites readers to work on these areas in any order with valuable, morale-boosting checklists and examples. Getting Your Life Back is the better of the two because it discusses antidepressants and because the authors' instructions and exercises are much more thorough. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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