Cover image for Architecture for the gods
Title:
Architecture for the gods
Author:
Crosbie, Michael J.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Watson-Guptill Publications, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
192 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm
General Note:
Previously published: Mulgrave, Vic. : Images Pub. Group, 1999.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780823002900
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library NA5212 .C76 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Houses of God demonstrates an inspiring array of gathering places for worship, collected from the USA and abroad. There are churches, synagogues and temples by some of the world's leading architects.


Author Notes

Michael J. Crosbie is a practising architect & architectural critic. He is the former editor of Progressive Architecture & writes for Domus, Architectural Record & Landscape Architecture. He also teaches architecture at the Roger Williams University & is author of the book Cesar Pelli: Recent Themes.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Advocates of aesthetic restraint in the service of God will find much to attack in this compendium of 43 highly adorned 20th-century North American houses of worship. Crosbie (architecture, Roger Williams Univ.) exercises able aesthetic and ecumenical judgment in his sensitive presentation of recent neo-baroque religious structures, which range from well-known national edifices to small abbeys. Each project and congregation is briefly introduced, followed by pages of photographs (exterior, interior, and ornamental details), site and floor plans, and elevations. Texts are descriptive and strive to capture how the architecture imparts and reinforces spiritual values and aspirations. Construction and renovation dates are often lacking, and some photos suffer from too much contrast. Nevertheless, this is an effective overview of affluent and awe-inspiring contemporary religious architecture. Most suitable for architecture collections but also for large public libraries.DRussell T. Clement, Northwestern Univ. Lib., Evanston, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview