Cover image for Strike!
Title:
Strike!
Author:
Brecher, Jeremy.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[San Francisco] : Straight Arrow Books; [distributed by World Pub. Co., New York], [1972]
Physical Description:
xiv, 329 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780879320119

9780879320188
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HD5324 .B7 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Brecher's riveting primer on modern American labor history catalogs U.S. workers' movements from the railroad strikes and Great Upheaval of July 1877 to the mass demonstrations and Haymarket affair of 1886 to Great Depression protests and Vietnam-era revolt to Time's declaration of The Protester as person of the year in 2011. Brecher dives inside the everyday struggles of rank-and-file workers and provides a thoroughly researched, alternative history rarely mentioned in textbooks or popular media. Each chapter contextualizes the wide array of tactics workers have employed to negotiate fair wages and humane working conditions since the nineteenth century, such as collective bargaining, organized protest, nonviolent resistance, and armed conflict. This edition (the first was published in 1972) includes additional chapters on the Battle of Seattle, which disrupted the 1999 meeting of the World Trade Organization, and Occupy Wall Street, which inspired demonstrations across the country. Not surprisingly, Brecher's text has been updated and reissued numerous times because of its compelling narrative style and exhaustive documentation. An important compendium, to be read alongside the books of Howard Zinn, Naomi Klein, and Noam Chomsky.--Báez, Diego Copyright 2014 Booklist


Choice Review

This book is an updated and revised version of the author's 1972 historical study of American labor conflict. From the workers' perspective, Brecher analyzes major strikes as a form of mass social action as well as an effort to achieve economic gains. Between the great railway strikes of 1877 and the wave of union militancy immediately after WW II, workers engaged in collective action to create labor solidarity and challenge workplace authority. Brecher argues that labor history has continued relevance for today's employees facing issues of falling incomes, economic insecurity, and lack of real power on the job. The deterioration of the collective bargaining system and pressures of global competition, he says, exacerbate those problems. A new concluding chapter deals with "labor on the eve of the millennium" and surveys developments between the Vietnam era and the United Parcel strike of 1997. Brecher views that period as of one of "working class retrenchment and disorganization" that leaves unions with few viable strategies for the future. The volume is a good introduction to important events in labor history, and the revisions underscore the significance of those events for the contemporary condition of American workers. All levels. R. L. Hogler Colorado State University


Booklist Review

Brecher's riveting primer on modern American labor history catalogs U.S. workers' movements from the railroad strikes and Great Upheaval of July 1877 to the mass demonstrations and Haymarket affair of 1886 to Great Depression protests and Vietnam-era revolt to Time's declaration of The Protester as person of the year in 2011. Brecher dives inside the everyday struggles of rank-and-file workers and provides a thoroughly researched, alternative history rarely mentioned in textbooks or popular media. Each chapter contextualizes the wide array of tactics workers have employed to negotiate fair wages and humane working conditions since the nineteenth century, such as collective bargaining, organized protest, nonviolent resistance, and armed conflict. This edition (the first was published in 1972) includes additional chapters on the Battle of Seattle, which disrupted the 1999 meeting of the World Trade Organization, and Occupy Wall Street, which inspired demonstrations across the country. Not surprisingly, Brecher's text has been updated and reissued numerous times because of its compelling narrative style and exhaustive documentation. An important compendium, to be read alongside the books of Howard Zinn, Naomi Klein, and Noam Chomsky.--Báez, Diego Copyright 2014 Booklist


Choice Review

This book is an updated and revised version of the author's 1972 historical study of American labor conflict. From the workers' perspective, Brecher analyzes major strikes as a form of mass social action as well as an effort to achieve economic gains. Between the great railway strikes of 1877 and the wave of union militancy immediately after WW II, workers engaged in collective action to create labor solidarity and challenge workplace authority. Brecher argues that labor history has continued relevance for today's employees facing issues of falling incomes, economic insecurity, and lack of real power on the job. The deterioration of the collective bargaining system and pressures of global competition, he says, exacerbate those problems. A new concluding chapter deals with "labor on the eve of the millennium" and surveys developments between the Vietnam era and the United Parcel strike of 1997. Brecher views that period as of one of "working class retrenchment and disorganization" that leaves unions with few viable strategies for the future. The volume is a good introduction to important events in labor history, and the revisions underscore the significance of those events for the contemporary condition of American workers. All levels. R. L. Hogler Colorado State University


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