Cover image for CrashBoomLove : a novel in verse
Title:
CrashBoomLove : a novel in verse
Author:
Herrera, Juan Felipe.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
ix, 155 pages ; 21 cm
Summary:
After his father leaves home, sixteen-year-old Cesar Garcia lives with his mother and struggles through the painful experiences of growing up as a Mexican American high school student.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
520 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 3.6 2.0 68830.

Reading Counts RC High School 6.5 7 Quiz: 21837 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780826321138

9780826321145
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Young Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

"Among the many books written on Germany after the collapse of Hitler's Thousand Year Reich, this book by Milton Mayer is one of the most readable and most enlightening."--Hans Kohn, New York Times Book Review

"It is a fascinating story and a deeply moving one. And it is a story that should make people pause and think--think not only about the Germans, but also about themselves."--Ernest S. Pisko, Christian Science Monitor

"Writing as a liberal American journalist of German descent and Jewish religious persuasion Mr. Mayer aims--and in the opinion of this reviewer largely succeeds--at scrupulous fairness and unsparing honesty. It is this that gives his book its muscular punch."--Walter L. Dorn, Saturday Review

"Once again the German problem is at the center of our politics. No better, or more humane, or more literate discussion of its underlying nature could be had than in this book."--August Heckscher, New York Herald Tribune


Summary

In this novel in verse--unprecedented in Chicano literature--renowned poet Juan Felipe Herrera illuminates the soul of a generation. Drawn from his own life as well as a lifetime of dedication to young people, CrashBoomLove helps readers understand what it is to be a teen, a migrant worker, and a boy wanting to be a boy.

Sixteen-year-old C#65533;sar Garc#65533;a is careening. His father, Papi C#65533;sar, has left the migrant circuit in California for his other wife and children in Denver. Sweet Mama Lucy tries to provide for her son with dichos and tales of her own misspent youth. But at Rambling West High School in Fowlerville, the sides are drawn: Hmongs vs. Chicanos vs. everybody vs. C#65533;sar, the new kid on the block.

Precise and profound, CrashBoomLove will appeal to and resonate with high school readers across the country.


Author Notes

Juan Felipe Herrara was named at the U.S.next Poet Laureate by the Library of Congress. He was Poet Laureate of California from 2012-2014 and is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Juan Felipe Herrara was named at the U.S.next Poet Laureate by the Library of Congress. He was Poet Laureate of California from 2012-2014 and is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. Noted poet Juan Felipe Herrera paints a devastating, yet ultimately hopeful portrait of Cesar Garcia, a 16-year-old Mexican teen growing up in the American high-school culture of Fowlerville, California. In a series of free-verse poems, Herrera describes the alienation of a teen who has been left with a struggling mother when his father returns to Denver to live with and support his second family. Cesar is the classic example of America's throwaway teen, a young man constantly in the wrong place at the wrong time who, because of his language and cultural differences, becomes more and more marginalized. It is also the story of an educational system that can occasionally make a difference in both teens' and adults' lives and futures. The book is not for the fainthearted. It's a complex narrative poem full of cruelty and despair that condemns a system that almost certainly guarantees failure. It explodes with rage; but, at the same time, it's a roller-coaster tour de force, remarkable for its ebullient portrait of hope and survival. A must purchase. --Frances Bradburn


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-Though not particularly well written, this narrative poem is a real page-turner. The story is of the fairly conventional Rebel without a Cause/To Sir with Love genre: the new kid doesn't fit in at school, struggles to find his place, witnesses the death of a friend, and finally finds himself with the help of a teacher. The twist is that the rebel in question is a young Chicano, which allows Herrera to toss in scattered bits of native slang (footnoted ad nauseam). C‚sar Garc'a is a confused, sometimes reckless, but always sympathetic figure who is struggling with his broken family, his sense of isolation, and his desire to just "crash against everything." He gets involved in petty crimes, some violence, and drugs, but he is always searching for something more. Unfortunately, while he's not quite one-dimensional, he rarely comes fully to life. Told entirely in his voice, the narrative at times becomes tiresome, or even pointless. However, some readers will relate to C‚sar and his friends (outcasts and lonely, misunderstood adolescents) and to their alienation.-Herman Sutter, Saint Agnes Academy, Houston, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. Noted poet Juan Felipe Herrera paints a devastating, yet ultimately hopeful portrait of Cesar Garcia, a 16-year-old Mexican teen growing up in the American high-school culture of Fowlerville, California. In a series of free-verse poems, Herrera describes the alienation of a teen who has been left with a struggling mother when his father returns to Denver to live with and support his second family. Cesar is the classic example of America's throwaway teen, a young man constantly in the wrong place at the wrong time who, because of his language and cultural differences, becomes more and more marginalized. It is also the story of an educational system that can occasionally make a difference in both teens' and adults' lives and futures. The book is not for the fainthearted. It's a complex narrative poem full of cruelty and despair that condemns a system that almost certainly guarantees failure. It explodes with rage; but, at the same time, it's a roller-coaster tour de force, remarkable for its ebullient portrait of hope and survival. A must purchase. --Frances Bradburn


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-Though not particularly well written, this narrative poem is a real page-turner. The story is of the fairly conventional Rebel without a Cause/To Sir with Love genre: the new kid doesn't fit in at school, struggles to find his place, witnesses the death of a friend, and finally finds himself with the help of a teacher. The twist is that the rebel in question is a young Chicano, which allows Herrera to toss in scattered bits of native slang (footnoted ad nauseam). C‚sar Garc'a is a confused, sometimes reckless, but always sympathetic figure who is struggling with his broken family, his sense of isolation, and his desire to just "crash against everything." He gets involved in petty crimes, some violence, and drugs, but he is always searching for something more. Unfortunately, while he's not quite one-dimensional, he rarely comes fully to life. Told entirely in his voice, the narrative at times becomes tiresome, or even pointless. However, some readers will relate to C‚sar and his friends (outcasts and lonely, misunderstood adolescents) and to their alienation.-Herman Sutter, Saint Agnes Academy, Houston, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview