Cover image for A colonial Quaker girl : the diary of Sally Wister, 1777-1778
Title:
A colonial Quaker girl : the diary of Sally Wister, 1777-1778
Author:
Wister, Sarah, 1761-1804.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Mankato, Minn. : Blue Earth Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
32 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Presents the diary of the sixteen-year-old daughter of a prominent Quaker family who moved with her family from British-occupied Philadelphia for the safety of the countryside during the Revolutionary War. Includes sidebars, activities, and a timeline related to this era.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
770 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 5.7 1.0 4526.
Genre:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780736803472

9780736803496
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Concord Library F158.44 .W75 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library F158.44 .W75 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Excerpts from the diary of Sarah Gillispie, a pioneer from Iowa in the nineteenth century. Includes activities and a timeline related to the era.


Summary

Presents the diary of the sixteen-year-old daughter of a prominent Quaker family who moved with her family from British-occupied Philadelphia for the safety of the countryside during the Revolutionary War. Includes activities and a timeline related to this era.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-Selections from portions of diaries bring to life the everyday activities of an Iowa farm girl and a family traveling by wagon train on the Oregon Trail. Misspellings and mistakes have been retained for authenticity. Some background on the girls, their families, and the period is included. Well-placed color and black-and-white illustrations, including family photographs and reproductions, and additional articles explain and expand on the material found in the diaries. In Farm Girl, sidebars discuss the one-room schoolhouse and preserving fruits and vegetables. Information on wagon-train rules, cholera, and more enhances Wagon Girl. Each book also includes a period craft or project with easy-to-follow instructions and suggestions for readers starting their own journal. The maps and time lines will be useful for reports. Readers of the "American Girls" series (Pleasant Co.), the "Dear America" series (Scholastic), and Marissa Moss's Rachel's Journal (Harcourt, 1998) will enjoy these titles. While slim, they provide personal glimpses into our history and introduce young readers to primary sources in historical context.-Carolyn Janssen, Rockford Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-This series features the edited diaries of real young people from different periods in American history. Captain's Daughter covers three years in the life of Laura Jernegan, who traveled with her family to the Pacific on whaling voyages. Schoolgirl offers passages from the diary of Caroline Cowles Richards, who lived in upstate New York with her wealthy grandparents. Quaker Girl presents excerpts from the journal of 16-year-old Sally Wister, who lived with her affluent family in Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary War. The texts are quite readable even though they retain the occasional misspelling and grammatical errors of the original sources. In all three books, sidebars provide background information, activity suggestions, and tips on starting a journal. Full-color and black-and-white photographs, reproductions, and drawings add clarity as well as visual appeal. This series will be the natural next step for fans of the "Dear America" fictional series (Scholastic).-Eunice Weech, M. L. King Elementary School, Urbana, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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