Cover image for A nineteenth-century schoolgirl : the diary of Caroline Cowles Richards, 1852-1855
Title:
A nineteenth-century schoolgirl : the diary of Caroline Cowles Richards, 1852-1855
Author:
Richards, Caroline Cowles, 1842-1913.
Publication Information:
Mankato, Minn. : Blue Earth Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
32 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Summary:
The diary of a ten-year-old girl who lived in western New York during the 1850s records her family and school life, clothing, transportation, and views on women's rights. Includes sidebars, activities, and a timeline related to this era.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 5.4 1.0 4520.
Genre:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780736803427
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library F129.C2 R53 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Hamburg Library F129.C2 R53 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Orchard Park Library F129.C2 R53 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The diary of Caroline Cowles Richards, a ten-year-old girl who lived in western New York during the 1850s who records her family and school life, clothing, transportation, and views on women's rights. Includes activities and a timeline related to this era.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-8. These titles, part of the Diaries, Letters, and Memoirs series, attempt to introduce readers to the first-person accounts of actual Americans. Forten, a 16-year-old African American living in Massachusetts, describes her schooling, her participation in the antislavery movement, and her reactions to the capture and return of a fugitive slave. Richards, a 10-year-old living in western New York state, discusses her family and school life, daily activities in a small town, and her reactions to the burgeoning women's rights movement. Both volumes begin with an introduction explaining primary sources, and provide numerous sidebars that clarify terms or topics and offer related projects. The format, with many illustrations, is pleasing, and the use of two colors for the text clearly separates the primary material from the commentary. These are tailor-made for history lessons or creative writing classes exploring the diary form. For more titles, see the Series Roundup. --Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-This series features the edited diaries of real young people from different periods in American history. Captain's Daughter covers three years in the life of Laura Jernegan, who traveled with her family to the Pacific on whaling voyages. Schoolgirl offers passages from the diary of Caroline Cowles Richards, who lived in upstate New York with her wealthy grandparents. Quaker Girl presents excerpts from the journal of 16-year-old Sally Wister, who lived with her affluent family in Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary War. The texts are quite readable even though they retain the occasional misspelling and grammatical errors of the original sources. In all three books, sidebars provide background information, activity suggestions, and tips on starting a journal. Full-color and black-and-white photographs, reproductions, and drawings add clarity as well as visual appeal. This series will be the natural next step for fans of the "Dear America" fictional series (Scholastic).-Eunice Weech, M. L. King Elementary School, Urbana, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview