Cover image for Legacies of the 1964 Civil Rights Act
Title:
Legacies of the 1964 Civil Rights Act
Author:
Grofman, Bernard.
Publication Information:
Charlottesville, VA : University Press of Virgina, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xvi, 320 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
The origin and enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 / David B. Filvaroff and Raymond E. Wolfinger -- What light does the Civil Rights Act of 1875 shed on the Civil Rights Act of 1964 / J. Morgan Kousser -- The Civil Rights Act and the American regulatory state / Hugh Davis Graham -- Litigation and lobbying as complementary strategies for civil rights / Stephen L. Wasby -- A personal reflection on civil rights enforcement and the civil rights agenda / Jack Greenberg -- The 1964 Civil Rights Act and American education / Gary Orfield -- The impact of EEO law: a social movement perspective / Paul Burstein -- The struggle for racial equality in public accommodations / Randall Kennedy -- Changing hearts and minds: racial attitudes and civil rights / Katherine Tate and Gloria J. Hampton -- Civil rights in a multicultural society / Luis Ricardo Fraga and Jorge Ruiz-de-Velasco -- The fife and drum march to the nineteenth century: thoughts on the emerging separate but equal doctrine / Barbara Phillips Sullivan -- Civil rights, the Constitution, common decency, and common sense / Bernard Grofman -- Afterword: U.S. Civil rights policies in comparative perspective / Robin M. Williams, Jr.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780813919201

9780813919218
Format :
Book

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Status
Central Library KF4757 .L44 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The 1964 Civil Rights Act, in conjunction with the Voting Rights Act of the following year, totally transformed the shape of American race relations. Supporters of the Civil Rights Act sought, at minimum, the elimination of racial segregation in publicly supported schools, hospitals, public transport, and other public spaces, and an end to open and blatant racial discrimination in employment practices.

Judged in those terms, the act is a remarkable success story. It has shown the power of the central government to change deeply entrenched patterns of behavior. In terms of the law, blacks are no longer second-class citizens. From other perspectives, however, the act is seen as a failure. Either it went too far, by institutionalizing race-specific forms of preferences, or it did not go far enough, leaving untouched the socioeconomic differences and lingering effects of past discrimination that perpetuate race-based inequities.

Legacies of the 1964 Civil Rights Act brings together a distinguished group of political scientists, historians, lawyers, statisticians, and sociologists who have written extensively on civil rights issues. The editor, Bernard Grofman, has asked the contributors to stand back from the immediate controversies about civil rights reflected in today's news and to provide historical and comparative perspective about this important legislation. Organized into four sections, the book covers the origins of the act and its historical evolution, its consequences in several different policy domains, and the future of civil rights in the United States. An appendix contains two somewhat more technical essays on legal standards for statutory violations and statistical issues in measuring discrimination.

Because the moral urgency of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was triggered by revulsion against racial segregation, the act's legacy is primarily seen in the life chances of African Americans. This volume provides a broad and detailed picture of the act's impact on African Americans' lives.


Summary

The 1964 Civil Rights Act, in conjunction with the Voting Rights Act of the following year, totally transformed the shape of American race relations. Supporters of the Civil Rights Act sought, at minimum, the elimination of racial segregation in publicly supported schools, hospitals, public transport, and other public spaces, and an end to open and blatant racial discrimination in employment practices.

Judged in those terms, the act is a remarkable success story. It has shown the power of the central government to change deeply entrenched patterns of behavior. In terms of the law, blacks are no longer second-class citizens. From other perspectives, however, the act is seen as a failure. Either it went too far, by institutionalizing race-specific forms of preferences, or it did not go far enough, leaving untouched the socioeconomic differences and lingering effects of past discrimination that perpetuate race-based inequities.

Legacies of the 1964 Civil Rights Act brings together a distinguished group of political scientists, historians, lawyers, statisticians, and sociologists who have written extensively on civil rights issues. The editor, Bernard Grofman, has asked the contributors to stand back from the immediate controversies about civil rights reflected in today's news and to provide historical and comparative perspective about this important legislation. Organized into four sections, the book covers the origins of the act and its historical evolution, its consequences in several different policy domains, and the future of civil rights in the United States. An appendix contains two somewhat more technical essays on legal standards for statutory violations and statistical issues in measuring discrimination.

Because the moral urgency of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was triggered by revulsion against racial segregation, the act's legacy is primarily seen in the life chances of African Americans. This volume provides a broad and detailed picture of the act's impact on African Americans' lives.


Author Notes

Bernard Grofman, Professor of Political Science and Social Psychology at the University of California, Irvine, is the author or editor of numerous books on voting equality.


Bernard Grofman, Professor of Political Science and Social Psychology at the University of California, Irvine, is the author or editor of numerous books on voting equality.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This is a very important compilation of essays written by authors whose task it was to evaluate the 1964 Civil Rights Act. They not only evaluate that law but also assess the current situation of civil rights. They agree that the 1964 act has brought about significant progress in race relations and has improved the lot of minorities. However, some warn that the conservative reaction which tried to dismantle desegregation remains very much alive in the courts and that racism, contrary to some recent studies, is very potent. The authors recognize that racism is a very complex set of attitudes and that remedies for it need to deal with that variety of views. One such area of concern is to realize that civil rights ideas and laws can be neither a matter of individual rights nor of group rights. Rather, all Americans must come to understand that they need to go beyond the 1964 law and share a common citizenship, civil responsibilities, and trust in the democratic process. Helpful bibliography. Appropriate for all collections. L. H. Grothaus emeritus, Concordia University


Choice Review

This is a very important compilation of essays written by authors whose task it was to evaluate the 1964 Civil Rights Act. They not only evaluate that law but also assess the current situation of civil rights. They agree that the 1964 act has brought about significant progress in race relations and has improved the lot of minorities. However, some warn that the conservative reaction which tried to dismantle desegregation remains very much alive in the courts and that racism, contrary to some recent studies, is very potent. The authors recognize that racism is a very complex set of attitudes and that remedies for it need to deal with that variety of views. One such area of concern is to realize that civil rights ideas and laws can be neither a matter of individual rights nor of group rights. Rather, all Americans must come to understand that they need to go beyond the 1964 law and share a common citizenship, civil responsibilities, and trust in the democratic process. Helpful bibliography. Appropriate for all collections. L. H. Grothaus emeritus, Concordia University


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