Cover image for The silver chair
Title:
The silver chair
Author:
Lewis, C. S. (Clive Staples), 1898-1963.
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Thorndike, ME : Thorndike Press, 2001.

©1953
Physical Description:
272 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
Two English children undergo hair-raising adventures as they go on a search and rescue mission for the missing Prince Rilian, who is held captive in the underground kingdom of the Emerald Witch.
General Note:
Originally published: New York : Macmillan, 1953. (Chronicles of Narnia ; bk. 6)
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.7 8.0 639.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780786222360
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Juvenile Large Print Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library X Juvenile Large Print Central Closed Stacks
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Clarence Library X Juvenile Large Print Large Print
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Our hardcover and paperback digest editions of THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA are now graced with new jacket and cover art by 2-time Caldecott medalist David Wiesner.


Author Notes

C. S. (Clive Staples) Lewis, "Jack" to his intimates, was born on November 29, 1898 in Belfast, Ireland. His mother died when he was 10 years old and his lawyer father allowed Lewis and his brother Warren extensive freedom. The pair were extremely close and they took full advantage of this freedom, learning on their own and frequently enjoying games of make-believe.

These early activities led to Lewis's lifelong attraction to fantasy and mythology, often reflected in his writing. He enjoyed writing about, and reading, literature of the past, publishing such works as the award-winning The Allegory of Love (1936), about the period of history known as the Middle Ages.

Although at one time Lewis considered himself an atheist, he soon became fascinated with religion. He is probably best known for his books for young adults, such as his Chronicles of Narnia series. This fantasy series, as well as such works as The Screwtape Letters (a collection of letters written by the devil), is typical of the author's interest in mixing religion and mythology, evident in both his fictional works and nonfiction articles.

Lewis served with the Somerset Light Infantry in World War I; for nearly 30 years he served as Fellow and tutor of Magdalen College at Oxford University. Later, he became Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University.

C.S. Lewis married late in life, in 1957, and his wife, writer Joy Davidman, died of cancer in 1960. He remained at Cambridge until his death on November 22, 1963.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-School bullies force Jill and Eustace to escape through a mysterious door at "Experiment House" and into a fantastical adventure in Narnia. This magical kingdom is full of mystical creatures like man-eating giants, Marsh-wiggles, and talking owls. Aslan, the Great Lion, gives the children the important task of rescuing Prince Rilian from the evil clutches of the beautiful green woman. Their trek to find him is marked with signs which they must recognize. The quest is fraught with danger and trickery. If the Prince is to be saved, the two children must conquer the evil Witch of the underworld who holds him captive in the eponymous silver chair. This audio version of the C.S. Lewis tale (HarperCollins, 1994) which continues The Chronicles of Narnia series is well-produced by the BBC. Expert editing creates mood and drama with a blend of experienced British acting, sound effects, and musical score. The story is recounted dramatically through dialogue. There is some loss of narrative detail, but listeners will be satisfied with this audio portrayal. This exciting presentation will prompt the Narnia-uninitiated to check out the books.-Lisa Denton, J.S. Russell Junior High School, Lawrenceville, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

The Silver Chair Chapter Twelve The Queen of Underland Two Earthmen entered, but instead of advancing into the room, they placed themselves one on each side of the door, and bowed deeply. They were followed immediately by the last person whom anyone had expected or wished to see: the Lady of the Green Kirtle, the Queen of Underland. She stood dead still in the doorway, and they could see her eyes moving as she took in the whole situation -- the three strangers, the silver chair destroyed, and the Prince free, with his sword in his hand. She turned very white; but Jill thought it was the sort of whiteness that comes over some people's faces not when they are frightened but when they are angry. For a moment the Witch fixed her eyes on the Prince, and there was murder in them. Then she seemed to change her mind. "Leave us," she said to the two Earthmen. "And let none disturb us till I call, on pain of death." The gnomes padded away obediently, and the Witch-queen shut and locked the door. "How now, my lord Prince," she said. "Has your nightly fit not yet come upon you, or is it over so soon? Why stand you here unbound? Who are these aliens? And is it they who have destroyed the chair which was your only safety?" Prince Rilian shivered as she spoke to him. And no wonder: it is not easy to throw off in half an hour an enchantment which has made one a slave for ten years. Then, speaking with a great effort, he said: "Madam, there will be no more need of that chair. And you, who have told me a hundred times how deeply you pitied me for the sorceries by which I was bound, will doubtless hear with joy that they are now ended for ever. There was, it seems, some small error in your Ladyship's way of treating them. These, my true friends, have delivered me. I am now in my right mind, and there are two things I will say to you. First -- as for your Ladyship's design of putting me at the head of an army of Earthmen so that I may break out into the Overworld and there, by main force, make myself king over some nation that never did me wrong -- murdering their natural lords and holding their throne as a bloody and foreign tyrant -- now that I know myself, I do utterly abhor and renounce it as plain villainy. And second: I am the King's son of Narnia, Rilian, the only child of Caspian, Tenth of that name, whom some call Caspian the Seafarer. Therefore, Madam, it is my purpose, as it is also my duty, to depart suddenly from your Highness's court into my own country. Please it you to grant me and my friends safe conduct and a guide through your dark realm." Now the Witch said nothing at all, but moved gently across the room, always keeping her face and eyes very steadily towards the Prince. When she had come to a little ark set in the wall not far from the fireplace, she opened it, and took out first a handful of a green powder. This she threw on the fire. It did not blaze much, but a very sweet and drowsy smell came from it. And all through the conversation which followed, that smell grew stronger, and filled the room, and made it harder to think. Secondly, she took out a musical instrument rather like a mandolin. She began to play it with her fingers -- a steady, monotonous thrumming that you didn't notice after a few minutes. But the less you noticed it, the more it got into your brain and your blood. This also made it hard to think. After she had thrummed for a time (and the sweet smell was now strong) she began speaking in a sweet, quiet voice. "Narnia?" she said. "Narnia? I have often heard your Lordship utter that name in your ravings. Dear Prince, you are very sick. There is no land called Narnia." "Yes, there is, though, Ma'am," said Puddleglum. "You see, I happen to have lived there all my life." "Indeed," said the Witch. "Tell me, I pray you, where that country is?" "Up there," said Puddleglum, stoutly, pointing overhead. "I -- I don't know exactly where." "How?" said the Queen, with a kind, soft, musical laugh. "Is there a country up among the stones and mortar of the roof?" "No," said Puddleglum, struggling a little to get his breath. "It's in the Overworld." "And what, or where, pray is this... how do you call it. . . Overworld?" "Oh, don't be so silly," said Scrubb, who was fighting hard against the enchantment of the sweet smell and the thrumming. "As if you didn't know! It's up above, up where you can see the sky and the sun and the stars. Why, you've been there yourself. We met you there." "I cry you mercy, little brother," laughed the Witch (you couldn't have heard a lovelier laugh). "I have no memory of that meeting. But we often meet our friends in strange places when we dream. And unless all dreamed alike, you must not ask them to remember it." "Madam," said the Prince sternly, "I have already told your Grace that I am the King's son of Narnia." "And shalt be, dear friend," said the Witch in a soothing voice, as if she were humouring a child, "shalt be king of many imagined lands in thy fancies." "We've been there, too," snapped Jill. She was very angry because she could feel enchantment getting hold of her every moment. But of course the very fact that she could still feel it, showed that it had not yet fully worked. "And thou art Queen of Narnia too, I doubt not, pretty one," said the Witch in the same coaxing, half-mocking tone. The Silver Chair . Copyright © by C. Lewis. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from The Silver Chair by Pauline Baynes, C. S. Lewis All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

1 Behind the Gymp. 3
2 Jill Is Given a Taskp. 19
3 The Sailing of the Kingp. 33
4 A Parliament of Owlsp. 48
5 Puddleglump. 63
6 The Wild Waste Lands of the Northp. 78
7 The Hill of the Strange Trenchesp. 95
8 The House of Harfangp. 110
9 How They Discovered Something Worth Knowingp. 126
10 Travels Without the Sunp. 140
11 In the Dark Castlep. 156
12 The Queen of Underlandp. 171
13 Underland Without the Queenp. 186
14 The Bottom of the Worldp. 200
15 The Disappearance of Jillp. 214
16 The Healing of Harmsp. 228

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