Cover image for Modern project management : successfully integrating project management knowledge areas and processes
Title:
Modern project management : successfully integrating project management knowledge areas and processes
Author:
Howes, Norman R.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : AMACOM, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xx, 262 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm + 1 computer optical disc (4 3/4 in.)
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780814406328
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
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Status
Central Library HD69.P75 H69 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This guide provides a modern, integrated treatment of all the essential methods of project management - and comes with a complete project management software on accompanying CD-ROM. a This work covers all the tools, including several for how to measure productivity.


Author Notes

Norman R. Howes has more than three decades of project management experience, primarily centered around the multivariate disciplines of information technologies.


Table of Contents

List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
How to Use the CDp. xix
Chapter 1. Introductionp. 1
Chapter 2. Project Planningp. 15
2.1 Subdivision of the Workp. 16
2.2 Quantification of the Workp. 23
2.3 Using Modern Project to Create a WBSp. 26
2.3.1 Entering WBS Informationp. 27
2.3.2 The WBS Listing Reportp. 32
2.3.3 Entering Task Datap. 34
2.3.4 The Task Budget Listing Reportp. 37
2.4 Sequencing the Workp. 39
2.5 Budgeting (Estimating) the Workp. 43
2.5.1 Using the Cost Accounts Entry/Edit Toolp. 47
2.5.2 Budget Reportsp. 50
2.6 Scheduling the Workp. 54
2.7 The Baseline Chartp. 62
Chapter 3. Project Monitoringp. 67
3.1 Collecting Actual Expendituresp. 68
3.2 Cost Reportsp. 72
3.3 Progress Trackingp. 74
3.4 Progress and Status Reportsp. 83
3.5 Scientific Forecastingp. 84
Chapter 4. Project Performance Evaluationp. 105
4.1 How Is Performance Evaluated?p. 106
4.2 Performance Evaluation Reportsp. 110
4.3 Variance Analysisp. 114
4.3.1 Cost Variancesp. 114
4.3.2 Schedule Variancesp. 116
4.3.3 Variance Reportingp. 118
4.3.4 The Cost Performance Ratiop. 119
4.3.5 The Schedule Performance Ratiop. 122
Chapter 5. Productivity Measurementp. 125
5.1 Unit Ratesp. 126
5.2 The Productivity Ratiop. 130
5.3 The Productivity Reportp. 131
5.4 The Importance of Productivity Measurementp. 132
Chapter 6. Alternate Viewsp. 135
6.1 Expanding the Task Listp. 136
6.2 The Expanded Cost Accountsp. 138
6.3 The Expanded Transaction Listsp. 142
6.3.1 New Cost Transactionsp. 142
6.3.2 New Progress Transactionsp. 145
6.3.3 New Variance Transactionsp. 150
6.4 Expanded Budget and Cost Reportsp. 150
6.5 The Organizational Breakdown Structure (OBS)p. 153
6.5.1 Building Alternate Hierarchiesp. 155
6.5.2 Exporting Alternate Hierarchies into the Project Databasep. 160
6.5.3 Hierarchy Maintenancep. 162
Chapter 7. Interfacing Scheduling Systemsp. 167
7.1 Task Sequencing with Microsoft Projectp. 167
7.1.1 Task-Naming Conventionp. 168
7.1.2 Task Sequencingp. 169
7.2 Resource Schedulingp. 179
7.2.1 Simple Schedulingp. 179
7.2.2 The Critical Pathp. 185
7.2.3 Resource Schedulingp. 188
7.2.3.1 How Resources Are Communicated to the Scheduling Systemp. 190
7.2.3.2 Using Microsoft Project to Produce the Resource Listp. 192
7.3 Pros and Cons of an Automated Interfacep. 200
7.4 The Automated Interface to Microsoft Projectp. 204
Chapter 8. Government Projectsp. 211
8.1 Historical Perspectivep. 211
8.2 Government Project Management Modelsp. 214
8.3 Government Project Management Vocabularyp. 217
8.3.1 Multibudgeting vs. the Tabp. 218
8.3.2 The Meaning of WBSp. 220
8.3.3 Government Performance Reportingp. 224
8.3.4 Additional Performance Measuresp. 228
Chapter 9. Risk Managementp. 231
9.1 Quantification of Riskp. 231
9.2 Contingency Draw-Downp. 234
9.3 Statusing Contingency Packagesp. 240
9.4 Risk Management Summaryp. 241
Chapter 10. Rescuing a Failing Projectp. 243
10.1 Determining What Went Wrongp. 243
10.2 Project Definitionp. 246
10.3 Translating a Definition into a Planp. 248
10.4 Replanningp. 250
Referencesp. 253
Indexp. 255

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