Cover image for Bully
Title:
Bully
Author:
Caseley, Judith.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, 2001.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Mickey has trouble with Mack, a bully at school, until he decides to try being nice to Mack and making him a friend.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.2 0.5 48269.
ISBN:
9780688178673

9780688178680
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Angola Public Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Collins Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eden Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Grand Island Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenmore Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lake Shore Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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City of Tonawanda Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Williamsville Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"You used to be a mouse," said Mickey to his ex-friend Jack. "And now you've turned into a great big rat."

Maybe Jack wasn't a rat, but he certainly was a bully. And he made life very uncomfortable for Mickey.

Mickey's parents had some helpful ideas, but Mickey found that it was easier to talk about loving your enemies than actually to do it, and brave words were often just words.

But then something happened that surprised Mickey as much as Jack. And the unexpected result was that the ex-bully was once more a friend, and Mickey had good reason to be proud of his problem-solving technique.


Author Notes

Judith Caseley was born in the small town of Winfield, New Jersey, a converted army development. She went to Syracuse University and majored in English, but felt she never would get all of the reading done because she worked in the cafeteria. I switched into art in my sophomore year. During her four years in college, she never took a single course in illustration or writing. Ten years later, from greeting cards to gallery work, she became an author and illustrator of children's books. She worked part-time as a receptionist for years until she could support herself. Much of Judith's work is semi-autobiographical. She takes small events from her life or from the lives of her children, and fictionalize them. "Field Day Friday" was based on her son Michael's field day, when his new sneaker fell off in the middle of the race. Judith wrote "Praying to A.L." while my father was dying of Alzheimer's Disease. It is a book that is close to her heart. It deals with loss, death, and rebirth.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-8. The bully and his victim get sympathy in this picture book. When Mickey's friend Jack turns into a bully, grabbing Mickey's cookies, tripping him in the lunchroom, and throwing Mickey's cap across the school bus, Mickey discusses it at home. Use brave words, Papa says. Try being nice to him, Mama says. It turns out that Jack is angry and hurt because he's feeling displaced by his baby sister. Mickey makes Jack laugh and they make up and become friends again. The solution is much too easy, of course, as every child will recognize, but the story does open up issues for discussion. Caseley's pictures in watercolor, colored pencil, and black pen show the various scenarios in the park, the school, and at home, and the hurt and anger between friends and enemies. For a much different take on bullying, see Becky Ray McCain's book Nobody Knew What to Do, on p.1760. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-Children familiar with Caseley's Field Day Friday (2000) and Mickey's Class Play (1998, both Greenwillow) will recognize the characters in this picture book. One afternoon, Mickey berates Jack for deliberately stepping on his foot. A few days later, readers discover that Jack has begun to harass his friend, stealing part of his lunch, breaking his pencil, and tripping him. Mickey's parents and sister suggest ways to understand or rectify the situation (use "brave" words because bullies are cowards; try to be nice because Jack must be feeling unhappy). At last, the boy is able to bring about a truce with some spontaneously offered cookies and a few kind words. The bully in this story is feeling neglected and out of sorts because of a new sibling at home. The friendship is resurrected, and though Jack does not apologize, readers will understand that his turnaround means that he, too, was unhappy about his behavior. Children who are the victims of true meanness from a classmate may find that Mickey's problem is rather easily resolved. Caseley's lighthearted, colorful, and detailed drawings, rendered in watercolor, colored pencil, and black pen, give an appealing portrayal of Mickey's school and home life, and are the book's strongest point.-Kathie Meizner, Montgomery County Public Libraries, Chevy Chase, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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