Cover image for Terminal illness
Title:
Terminal illness
Author:
Williams, Mary E., 1960-
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
208 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
How can care of the terminally ill be improved? -- How should the physical and emotional pain of terminal illness be addressed? -- Should physicians be permitted to hasten the deaths of terminally ill patients? -- Do the terminally ill have the right to die?
ISBN:
9780737705256

9780737705263
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library R726.8 .T4646 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Some of the most difficult choices that society faces involve the care and treatment of the fatally ill. Chapters include: How Can Society Best Meet the Needs of the Terminally Ill? How Can People Best Cope With Terminal Illness? Should Physicians Be Permitted to Hasten the Deaths of the Terminally Ill? Do the Terminally Ill Have the Right to Die?


Summary

Some of the most difficult choices that society faces involve the care and treatment of the fatally ill. Chapters include: How Can Society Best Meet the Needs of the Terminally Ill? How Can People Best Cope With Terminal Illness? Should Physicians Be Permitted to Hasten the Deaths of the Terminally Ill? Do the Terminally Ill Have the Right to Die?


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 7^-12. With this volume, the Opposing Viewpoints Series takes an intriguing detour from its usual format by exploring a topic that doesn't always invite direct point-counterpoint arguments. Instead, early chapters explore different ways of addressing concerns for the terminally ill, their families, and caretakers. Initial essays discuss the effectiveness of hospices, the value of dying at home, and the input that patients should have in their treatment and death. Subsequent essays move into the more familiar should-shouldn't arguments, and quite effectively tackle euthanasia, the legalization of marijuana, a physician's right to hasten death, and a patient's right to die. With so many individual issues in one volume, this text will prove useful for a wide range of research topics. In addition to the periodical and book bibliographies, the appendix also includes an "Organizations to Contact" list with each group's street and Web addresses and telephone and fax numbers, plus a full paragraph describing the organization's mission. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-This clearly written title addresses hospice, home, and hospital care; discusses pain management (or lack of), including opinions on the legalization of marijuana; looks at varying positions on the withdrawal of life support and euthanasia; and offers varying viewpoints on a patient's right to die. Questions are posed at the beginning of each chapter and article, and each section of six or seven essays concludes with a list of periodical resources. The selected essays were written by patients, philosophy and ethics professors, and physicians. The opinions of a caregiver, a politician, and a lawyer are also represented. A few black-and-white political cartoons illustrate the book.-Martha Gordon, formerly at South Salem Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 7^-12. With this volume, the Opposing Viewpoints Series takes an intriguing detour from its usual format by exploring a topic that doesn't always invite direct point-counterpoint arguments. Instead, early chapters explore different ways of addressing concerns for the terminally ill, their families, and caretakers. Initial essays discuss the effectiveness of hospices, the value of dying at home, and the input that patients should have in their treatment and death. Subsequent essays move into the more familiar should-shouldn't arguments, and quite effectively tackle euthanasia, the legalization of marijuana, a physician's right to hasten death, and a patient's right to die. With so many individual issues in one volume, this text will prove useful for a wide range of research topics. In addition to the periodical and book bibliographies, the appendix also includes an "Organizations to Contact" list with each group's street and Web addresses and telephone and fax numbers, plus a full paragraph describing the organization's mission. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-This clearly written title addresses hospice, home, and hospital care; discusses pain management (or lack of), including opinions on the legalization of marijuana; looks at varying positions on the withdrawal of life support and euthanasia; and offers varying viewpoints on a patient's right to die. Questions are posed at the beginning of each chapter and article, and each section of six or seven essays concludes with a list of periodical resources. The selected essays were written by patients, philosophy and ethics professors, and physicians. The opinions of a caregiver, a politician, and a lawyer are also represented. A few black-and-white political cartoons illustrate the book.-Martha Gordon, formerly at South Salem Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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