Cover image for There once was a man named Michael Finnegan
Title:
There once was a man named Michael Finnegan
Author:
Hoberman, Mary Ann.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First ed.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little, Brown and Co., 2001.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
An elaborated version of the repetitive children's song about a man who creates quite a "din-igan" playing the "violin-igan."
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.8 0.5 51683.
ISBN:
9780316363013
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
Searching...
Clarence Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Collins Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
East Aurora Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Eden Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Elma Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Kenmore Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Orchard Park Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

'The team which collaborated on The Eensy-Weensy Spider meet again to offer an elaborated version of the repetitive children''s song about a man who creates quite a din-igan playing the violin-igan. 15,000 first printing.'.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 2-6. The author-artist team who did Eensy-Weensy Spider [BKL Mr 1 00] gets together again for another uproarious picture book of simple nonsense verse. This time they take the old Michael Finnegan chant, add several stanzas, and invent their own rhyming story. Michael Finnegan is so poor, his clothes are tattered and he holds "his pants up with a pin-igan." He plays the "violin-igan" on the sidewalk, but he makes such an awful "din-igan" that the neighbors pay him to stop. No one likes his violin-igan--until he meets a dog that also has whiskers on its "chin-igan," and who loves the music. "Begin-igan." Kids will delight in the silly word play, the wild slapstick details of the big, bright line-and-watercolor pictures, and the cozy, sloppy ending, when the dog kisses Michael on his chin-igan. Begin-igan. The musical notation is on the first page, and this is sure to be a loud join-in favorite for preschool story hour and at home. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

Several books invite youngsters to join in the fun. There Once Was a Man Named Michael Finnegan, adapted by Mary Ann Hoberman, illus. by Nadine Bernard Westcott, is a silly song that instructs young singers to "begin-igan" at the end of each verse. On a vertical spread, "Michael played the violin-igan,/ Tucked it underneath his chin-igan,/ Played so loud it was a sin-igan,/ Noisy Michael Finnegan, begin-igan." Westcott illustrates each lively scene with humorous details; the baby and the cat look even more distressed than the rest of the family. Music and lyrics are included. ( Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-The successful author-illustrator team behind such titles as Miss Mary Mack (1998) and The Eensy-Weensy Spider (2000, both Little, Brown) has brought another silly song into the world of picture books. Poor Michael Finnegan's violin playing is sorely underappreciated. It is only when he finds a dog he names Quinn-igan (who enjoys the awful "din-igan" of the "violin-igan") that the man is truly happy. In this adapted and elongated version of the traditional song, verses have been added to create some semblance of a story. Sometimes it's a bit of a stretch, as when Michael Finnegan "Took the money from their tin-igan,/Bought a house and moved right in-igan" or when he "Played so loud it was a sin-igan." Still, the book is sure to be a hit with the storytime crowd. The exuberance of this silly romp is wonderfully conveyed in the wacky watercolor-and-ink illustrations that show the tattered, unshaven man and his grinning canine companion.-Piper L. Nyman, Fairfield/Suisun Community Library, Fairfield, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview