Cover image for Crocodile and hen : a Bakongo folktale
Title:
Crocodile and hen : a Bakongo folktale
Author:
Lexau, Joan M.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Newly illustrations edition.
Publication Information:
[New York] : HarperCollins, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
45 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.
Summary:
Crocodile is so confused by Hen calling him "brother" every time he gets ready to eat her that he finally goes searching for an explanation of how such a relationship can be.
General Note:
Adaptation of Why the crocodile does not eat the hen, from Notes on the folklore of the Fjort (French Congo), by R. E. Dennett.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
120 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.2 0.5 49402.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.5 1 Quiz: 24924 Guided reading level: H.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060284862

9780060284879
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Notable Children's Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies (NCSS/CBC)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. Kshe says: "My brother, don't eat me." It's the word brother that throws Crocodile for a loop. "I live in water" he thinks, "I don't have feathers." How could we be related? His friend Lizard comes up with an answer (crocodiles and hens both lay eggs) that allows Crocodile to talk to his new sister "as a brother should." The vocabulary is basic, but quotes are introduced, giving new readers a little more challenge. The book is also a very simple introduction to the folktale format, with Lexau providing some notes about the story, which comes from the Republic of the Congo. Unfortunately, the pictures, though colorful and nicely excecuted, lack the energy the telling deserves. --Stephanie Zvirin


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-2-Lexau offers an easy-reader version of her picture book Crocodile and Hen (Harper & Row, 1969; o.p.), having modified the sentence structures into simple constructions. Cumulative elements flow smoothly as Crocodile worries about how he can devour Hen when she keeps calling him "my brother" and has no fear of him. Befuddled, he seeks the advice of Lizard to try to understand why he can't savor "that fat, good-to-eat Hen," and his friend offers a simple but satisfactory explanation. Cushman's multicolored, watercolor palette replaces Joan Sandin's green, yellow, and blue shades in the earlier edition. They capture the humor of the situation and the characters' expressions. A well-documented, true-to-its-source folktale.-Nancy Call, Santa Cruz Public Libraries, Aptos, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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