Cover image for Some things change
Title:
Some things change
Author:
Murphy, Mary, 1961-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Co., 2001.

©2000
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
A little penguin finds that everything, from weather to water to feelings, can often change.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
"Ages 1-4"--cover p. [4].
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 0.8 0.5 48111.
ISBN:
9780618003341
Format :
Book

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Lancaster Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Cloudy days change to sunny Water changes to ice Ice changes to water

The world is filled with changes -- some we can control and some we can't. They just happen. Some changes are exciting. Some are surprising. And some changes can even be a little bit scary. But some things, like a mother's love, are best because they never change at all.
In this latest book featuring the dear little penguin, Mary Murphy once again has created an endearing and reassuring book that captures the complex simplicity of childhood. Children will be drawn to the bright, bold illustrations and to the similarities they see between themselves and penguin.

Mary Murphy has written and illustrated many bright, beguiling children's books, including I Make a Cake, I Am an Artist, and Please Be Quiet. Ms. Murphy lives in Dublin, Ireland.


Author Notes

Mary Murphy has published several children's books, including I LIKE IT WHEN, which won the Parenting Magazine Gold Medal. She lives in Dublin, Ireland.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 1^-4. This bright, bouncy concept book has a young penguin and his teddy bear as tour guides through a variety of familiar changes. Penguin starts with something very familiar to toddlers--a cardboard box that can be a cave one moment, a ship the next. Next, Penguin flies a kite on a cloudy day that changes to a sunny one. He's pictured ice-skating and then licking a popsicle. The examples become increasingly complex ("I change my mind"), but the ideas remain accessible to very young children. The art, in brilliant primary colors with arrestingly simple figures, provides further clarification. The thought-provoking book ends with gentle reassurance: the picture shows the penguin and its baby sibling in a loving embrace with their mother as the text reads, "Some things never change." --Connie Fletcher


Publisher's Weekly Review

What's black and white and likely to be read all over? This cheery paper-over-board addition to Murphy's (Please Be Quiet!; My Puffer Train) canon of penguin books for toddlers. Here, a young penguin observes how the things in its life and surroundings are apt to change a cardboard box becomes a ship, water turns to ice, walls in the home are painted different colors. Moods and minds change, too, a fact that seems to make each day a new adventure. But while many things are in flux, the book's final spread offers a reassuring exception: the constant love of a parent. "Some things stay the same," reads the text, as the art depicts a parent-and-child hug. Everything about the book's design is appealingly bold, from the solid-colored backgrounds and thick, hand-lettered style of the text to the penguin's bright fried-egg, yellow-on-white belly. Young children will appreciate the verisimilitude and comforting notes that Murphy hits just right. Ages 1-4. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-The penguins from Please Be Quiet! (Houghton, 1999) are back in this engaging book. Through mostly concrete examples, the concept of change is explored on many levels. A cardboard box in the flippers of a youngster can change from being a cave to a ship; a cloudy day can turn into a sunny one; a child changes by growing taller; a home can change with a coat of paint; and individuals can even change their minds. These examples, featuring playful and loving situations, make an often-scary concept seem like a comfortable, everyday experience. The bold and vivid colors and familiar situations will appeal to preschoolers who will enjoy the simplicity of the illustrations. A good choice for sharing with a group or one-on-one.-Genevieve Ceraldi, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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