Cover image for Russia
Title:
Russia
Author:
Fader, Kim Brown, 1956-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Lucent Books, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
144 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Examines the history of the country now known as the Russian Federation, from its earliest days through its role as part of the Soviet Union to its current place in the world.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 11.2 6.0 31300.
ISBN:
9781560065210
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DK41 .F33 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library DK41 .F33 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Examines the history of the country now known as the Russian Federation, from its earliest days through its role as part of the Soviet Union to its current place in the world.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 UpÄTextual sidebars and good historical maps enrich this gracefully written history from the time of the Scythians (800-200 B.C.) to the Russian Federation in 1997. However, the text, though admirably presented with apt references to events outside of Russia, has been so tightly condensed that it may best serve students who already have some knowledge of the subject. The chapter on the arts in Russia is a laudable attempt to be inclusive, but the overall picture may be lost in the plethora of names. Oddly enough, although several portrait painters are noted, there is no mention of Repin, the most famous 19th-century artist. Also, there is no indication that individuals such as Chagall and Stravinsky emigrated, spending some of their most creative decades abroad. On the positive side, chapters on "The New Russia" and "Russia in the World Community" offer much up-to-date information on the transition and foreign policy. Many of the suggestions for further reading are more appropriate for college than high school students. Average to poorly reproduced black-and-white photos and reproductions appear throughout. While the history is superior to James Strickler's Russia of the Tsars (Lucent, 1997), many students will prefer Michael Kort's Russia (Facts on File, 1995), which is longer but easier to read, better on Russian culture, and offers more on daily life.ÄElizabeth Talbot, University of Illinois, Champaign (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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