Cover image for Encyclopedia of environmental studies
Title:
Encyclopedia of environmental studies
Author:
Ashworth, William, 1942-
Personal Author:
Edition:
New edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Facts on File, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
vii, 600 pages : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780816042555
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TD9 .A84 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Praise for the previous edition:
...a readable, informative source...highly recommended for public and undergraduate libraries..., Choice


an up-to date dictionary...useful to activists, students, and others who need clear definitions...for terms in environmental literature..., Booklist


...a very useful source of basic explanations of terms related to one of today's very hot topics. , Wilson Library Bulletin


...a major contribution to helping the diverse constituency of environmentalism speak the same language. , American Reference Books Annual


Written by two experts in the field


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

This up-to-date dictionary with more than 3,000 entries should be useful to activists, students, and others who need clear definitions--along with helpful background information--for terms they read in environmental literature. The author has written several other books on environmental topics, among them Nor Any Drop to Drink: The American Water Crisis. He was helped in the compilation of the book by an editorial board from specialist fields: an organic chemist, an attorney with the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund, a pollution-control engineer, and a U.S. Forest Service forester. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the field, several disciplines are treated here, including chemistry, biology, geology, and ecology. Profiles of agencies (both current and defunct), organizations, and significant legislation are also included. Brief biographies of environmental activitists and writers like Barry Commoner and Paul Ehrlich are found. Some representative entries are abortion, Adirondack Mountain Club, Alaska National Interest Lands Act, bioregion, lateritic soils, Ogallala Aquifer, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), Roadless Area Review and Evaluation, and xenolith. Environmental disasters such as Love Canal, Chernobyl, and Exxon Valdez appear as entries, as do topics of current controversy (greenhouse effect, monkey wrench gang, spotted owl management area). Definitions, which vary in length from a sentence to more than a page, are readable, informative as to the term's environmental significance, and aimed at the layperson. Terms within entries that have their own entries are in small capital letters. A generous number of see and see also references lead the reader to more information. Statistics are sometimes given (in off-road vehicle: "25% of the U.S. population engages in off-road vehicle recreation each year"), but no sources are cited. Pronunciation is not provided for terms, but more than 60 line drawings and tables help illustrate some definitions. At the back of the book are found a lengthy bibliography and a detailed index. There is little overlap between this book and The Facts On File Dictionary of Environmental Science (1991), which includes very technical terms with briefer entries. It overlaps more with Allaby's Dictionary of the Environment (3d ed., New York Univ., 1989), which also touches on agencies, organizations, and legislation. However, Allaby's definitions also are shorter, with none more than a paragraph in length. Public, high school, and undergraduate libraries will find The Encyclopedia of Environmental Studies a useful resource for this vital topic. (Reviewed Jan. 15, 1992)


Library Journal Review

Due to the cross-disciplinary nature of the environmental sciences, selection of a specific term for inclusion in an environmental encyclopedia becomes a judgment call. This encyclopedia is strong in earth science, chemistry, and forestry, but not as strong in gardening and issues affecting the average homeowner. For instance, ``epilimnion,'' ``cytotoxin,'' and ``salvage cutting'' are discussed, but not ``organic farming,'' ``radon,'' or ``compost.'' Michael Allaby's Dictionary of the Envi ronment (New York Univ. Pr., 1989. 3d ed.) has a more popular approach and does include, for instance, the latter three terms. Ashworth's reference includes numerous entries for associations, but unlike Dictionary of the Environment , does not cover specific events such as Chernobyl. Even terms promised in the catalog copy for the book--``Three Mile Island,'' for instance--are not included. This reference may have some value, however, for research collections.-- Susan McKimm, Cuyahoga Cty. P.L., Cleveland (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

For present-day increased environmental awareness, this updated encyclopedia provides needed and accurate information. New topics include ecoterrorism, forest types, human population trends, pest control, toxic chemicals, medical waste, and waterpower. One thousand entries have been revised or added since the 1991 edition, bringing the total to more than 4,000. The focus has evolved from the hard sciences to include social sciences such as economics, politics, and philosophy. Also included are revised and new statistics, maps, and tables. See references abound. The extensive bibliography includes many sources--periodicals, books, agency reports (private sector as well as state and federal offices). Missing are Web sites--this would have been useful at a time when academics and the public do so much research online. Some readers will look for, but not find, "mutant frogs," "law," "legislation," or "butterfly." A compilation of state and federal agencies and important federal laws probably would be used (Clean Air Act, etc.). Definitions are easy to read. Sure to be in demand in academic and public libraries. P. Miller New Hampshire Community Technical College--Berlin/Laconia


Excerpts

Excerpts

Praise for the previous edition: ...a readable, informative source...highly recommended for public and undergraduate libraries...--Choice ...an up-to date dictionary...useful to activists, students, and others who need clear definitions...for terms in environmental literature...--Booklist ...a very useful source of basic explanations of terms related to one of today's very hot topics.--Wilson Library Bulletin ...a major contribution to helping the diverse constituency of environmentalism speak the same language.--American Reference Books Annual Written by two experts in the field, the new edition of Encyclopedia of Environmental Studies, New Edition is an essential guide for scientists, students, or anyone who works with--or needs a better understanding of--the environmental language from different disciplines. Reflecting the shift from scientific to a more issue-based approach, the book offers unrivaled coverage of today's global environment with more than 4,000 A-to-Z entries--1,000 more than in the previous edition--on pressing issues and facets of modern environmental science. The revised edition contains: New topics based on college-level environmental studies courses. Updated information on key environmental issues, organizations, and personalities New and updated statistics, maps, diagrams, tables, schematics, and graphs. New entries include: Anti-environmentalism Conservation and Research Foundation Forest types Human population trends Medical waste Pest control Toxic chemicals Water power and more. Excerpted from Encyclopedia of Environmental Studies by Charles E. Little, William Ashworth All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Introductionp. V
Entries A-Zp. 1
Bibliographyp. 549
Indexp. 565

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