Cover image for Introduction to indexing and abstracting
Title:
Introduction to indexing and abstracting
Author:
Cleveland, Donald B., 1935-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Third edition.
Publication Information:
Englewood, Colo. : Libraries Unlimited, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xiii, 283 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781563086410
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library Z695.9 .C592 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Based on new research and years of practical experience, this guide presents the basic knowledge necessary to become a professional indexer. Synthesizing the thinking and experience of indexers and abstractors over the years, the book introduces readers to such fundamentals as the nature of information, the organization of information, vocabulary control, types of indexes and abstracts, evaluation of indexing, and the use of computers. A new chapter on indexing and the Internet has been added, as has a chapter that lists Web resources for indexers and abstractors. The work concludes with a discussion of the education, training, and job opportunities of the profession, as well as a look to the future. With its simple but thorough approach, this book provides readers with a broad overview of the professions, processes, and art of indexing and abstracting.


Author Notes

DONALD B. CLEVELAND is Professor, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton.

ANA D. CLEVELAND is Professor, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xiii
Chapter 1 Introductionp. 1
Making an Indexp. 1
The Need for Indexesp. 2
The Nature of Indexesp. 4
Makers of Indexesp. 5
A Brief Historical Perspectivep. 6
A Note to the Neophyte Indexerp. 9
Chapter 2 The Nature of Informationp. 11
The Information Agep. 11
A Natural Phenomenonp. 13
The Study of Informationp. 18
A Basic Resourcep. 18
Mechanisms for Information Preservation and Transmittalp. 19
Chapter 3 The Organization of Informationp. 22
The Information Cyclep. 22
The Basic Information Retrieval Modelp. 23
The Information Is Created and Acquired for the Systemp. 24
Knowledge Records Are Analyzed and Tagged by Sets of Index Termsp. 26
The Knowledge Records Are Stored Physically and the Index Terms Are Stored into a Structured Filep. 26
The User's Query Is Tagged with Sets of Index Terms and Then Is Matched Against the Tagged Recordsp. 27
Matched Documents Are Retrieved for Reviewp. 27
Feedback May Lead to Several Reiterations of the Searchp. 28
Classification and Indexingp. 29
The Relationship of Indexing, Abstracting, and Searchingp. 31
Using Indexes and Abstractsp. 33
Chapter 4 Vocabulary Controlp. 35
The Purpose of Controlled Vocabularyp. 35
The Nature of Indexing Languagesp. 37
Authority Listsp. 38
Generic Vocabulariesp. 39
The Thesaurusp. 40
Thesaurus Constructionp. 41
Term Relationshipsp. 43
Term Formsp. 45
Thesaurus Evaluationp. 46
Chapter 5 Types of Indexes and Abstractsp. 48
Types of Indexesp. 48
Alphabetical Indexesp. 48
Author Indexesp. 49
Book Indexesp. 49
Citation Indexesp. 49
Classified Indexesp. 51
Coordinate Indexesp. 51
Cumulative Indexesp. 51
Faceted Indexesp. 51
First-line Indexesp. 52
Hypermedia Indexesp. 52
Internet Indexesp. 52
Multimedia Indexesp. 53
Periodical Indexesp. 53
Permuted Title Indexesp. 54
String Indexesp. 54
Word Indexesp. 55
Types of Abstractsp. 55
Indicative Abstractsp. 56
Informative Abstractsp. 57
Critical Abstractsp. 57
Classifying Abstracts by Usep. 58
Classifying Abstracts by Authorp. 58
Structured Abstractsp. 59
Examples from Indexing Toolsp. 61
Examples from Abstracting Toolsp. 74
Examples of Thesaurip. 91
Chapter 6 The Indexing Processp. 97
Aboutnessp. 98
Steps in Indexingp. 99
Recording of Bibliographic Datap. 100
Content Analysisp. 101
The Titlep. 101
The Abstractp. 101
The Text Itselfp. 102
The References Sectionp. 102
Some Key Pointsp. 103
Subject Determinationp. 103
Locatorsp. 104
Term Selectionp. 104
Entry Pointsp. 104
Depth of Indexingp. 105
Exhaustivityp. 105
Specificityp. 106
Making Choicesp. 106
Display of Indexesp. 107
Chapter 7 The Abstracting Processp. 108
The Purpose of an Abstractp. 108
Coveragep. 109
Economic Constraintsp. 109
Significant Materialp. 109
Publication Sourcep. 109
Subject Interest of the Usersp. 110
Steps in Abstractingp. 110
Step 1p. 110
The Titlep. 110
The Authorp. 111
Author Affiliationp. 111
Funding Agencyp. 111
Publication Sourcep. 112
Foreign Languagesp. 113
Other Informationp. 113
Step 2p. 113
Step 3p. 115
Step 4p. 117
Step 5p. 117
Editingp. 118
Evaluation of Abstractsp. 119
The Writing Processp. 119
Chapter 8 Indexing and Abstracting a Documentp. 121
Example of a Technical Paperp. 121
Abstracting the Documentp. 129
Indexing the Documentp. 131
Chapter 9 Book Indexingp. 137
The Nature of Book Indexesp. 137
Steps in Indexingp. 139
Step 1p. 139
Step 2p. 139
Step 3p. 139
Step 4p. 139
Step 5p. 139
Index Termsp. 140
Name Entriesp. 142
Subject Entriesp. 144
Additional Detailsp. 145
Ninety-Nine "Dos-and-Don'ts"p. 146
Chapter 10 Book Indexing Examplep. 150
Example Book Chapterp. 150
Indexing the Chapterp. 160
Chapter 11 Indexing Special Subject Areas and Formatsp. 165
Backgroundp. 165
Special Subject Areasp. 166
Sciencep. 166
Social Sciencesp. 168
Humanitiesp. 169
Special Formatsp. 171
Newspapersp. 171
Nonprint Formsp. 174
Imagesp. 174
Chapter 12 Evaluation of Indexingp. 179
Backgroundp. 179
The General Problemp. 180
Beginning with the Userp. 182
Relevancep. 183
Recall and Precisionp. 185
Effects of Exhaustivity and Specificityp. 187
Index Qualityp. 187
Evaluating Abstractsp. 189
Standardsp. 189
Editingp. 190
Chapter 13 Indexing and Abstracting Servicesp. 192
Backgroundp. 192
Bringing in the Computersp. 193
Types of Databasesp. 194
Online Servicesp. 195
Searching the Databasep. 196
The Futurep. 199
Chapter 14 The Use of Computersp. 200
The Computer Toolp. 200
The Scriptp. 204
Indexing with a Computerp. 206
Types of Indexing Softwarep. 207
Indexing Softwarep. 209
Automatic Indexing and Abstractingp. 211
Indexingp. 211
Abstractingp. 213
Chapter 15 Indexing and the Internetp. 215
Backgroundp. 215
Searching the Webp. 216
Organization of Informationp. 220
Metadata and the Webp. 223
Dublin Corep. 224
OCLC CORCp. 226
CORC Resource Record Databasep. 226
CORC Authority Databasep. 226
CORC Pathfinder Databasep. 226
CORC Web Deweyp. 226
Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs)p. 227
Summaryp. 227
Promises and Pitfallsp. 228
Chapter 16 Ninety-Nine Web Resources for Indexers and Abstractorsp. 231
Online Bookstoresp. 231
Search Servicesp. 232
Indexing Servicesp. 233
Dictionaries and Dictionary Directoriesp. 234
Multireference Resources and Toolsp. 234
E-Mail Reference Sitesp. 236
Virtual Librariesp. 237
Special Formats and Subjects Indexingp. 238
Standardsp. 238
Indexing Softwarep. 239
Publishersp. 239
Indexing Organizationsp. 240
Indexing-Related Discussion Groupsp. 240
Indexing and the Webp. 241
Chapter 17 The Professionp. 242
Education and Trainingp. 242
Job Opportunitiesp. 243
The Role of Researchp. 245
The Futurep. 249
The Final Wordp. 249
Glossaryp. 251
Bibliographyp. 261
Indexp. 277

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