Cover image for Greek thought : a guide to classical knowledge
Title:
Greek thought : a guide to classical knowledge
Author:
Brunschwig, Jacques.
Uniform Title:
Savoir grec. English.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
xv, 1024 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Philosophy. The philosopher ; Images of the world ; Myth and knowledge ; The question of being ; Epistemology ; Ethics -- Politics. The statesman as political actor ; Inventing politics ; Utopia and the critique of politics ; The sage and politics -- The pursuit of knowledge. Schools and sites of learning ; Observation and research ; Demonstration and the idea of science ; Astronomy ; Cosmology ; Geography ; Harmonics ; History ; Language ; Logic ; Mathematics ; Medicine ; Physics ; Poetics ; Rhetoric ; Technology ; Theology and divination ; Theories of religion -- Major figures. Anaxagoras ; Antisthenes ; Archimedes ; Aristotle ; Democritus ; Epicurus ; Euclid ; Galen ; Heraclitus ; Herodotus ; Hippocrates ; Parmenides ; Plato ; Plotinus ; Plutarch ; Polybius ; Protagoras ; Ptolemy ; Pyrrhon ; Socrates ; Thucydides ; Xenophon ; Zeno -- Currents of thought. The academy ; Aristotelianism ; Cynicism ; Hellenism and Christianity ; Hellenism and Judaism ; The Milesians ; Platonism ; Pythagoreanism ; Skepticism ; Sophists ; Stoicism.
ISBN:
9780674002616
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Ancient Greek thought is the essential wellspring from which the intellectual, ethical, and political civilization of the West draws and to which, even today, we repeatedly return. In more than sixty essays by an international team of scholars, this volume explores the full breadth and reach of Greek thought--investigating what the Greeks knew as well as what they thought about what they knew, and what they believed, invented, and understood about the conditions and possibilities of knowing. Calling attention to the characteristic reflexivity of Greek thought, the analysis in this book reminds us of what our own reflections owe to theirs.

In sections devoted to philosophy, politics, the pursuit of knowledge, major thinkers, and schools of thought, this work shows us the Greeks looking at themselves, establishing the terms for understanding life, language, production, and action. The authors evoke not history, but the stories the Greeks told themselves about history; not their poetry, but their poetics; not their speeches, but their rhetoric. Essays that survey political, scientific, and philosophical ideas, such as those on Utopia and the Critique of Politics, Observation and Research, and Ethics; others on specific fields from Astronomy and History to Mathematics and Medicine; new perspectives on major figures, from Anaxagoras to Zeno of Elea; studies of core traditions from the Milesians to the various versions of Platonism: together these offer a sense of the unquenchable thirst for knowledge that marked Greek civilization--and that Aristotle considered a natural and universal trait of humankind. With thirty-two pages of color illustrations, this work conveys the splendor and vitality of the Greek intellectual adventure.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Editors Brunschwig (emeritus, the Sorbonne, Paris) and Lloyd (Univ. of Cambridge) have compiled a collection of more than 60 essays that takes an untraditional approach to the study of Greek thought. Rather than analyzing Greek philosophy, politics, and science and discussing their influence on contemporary Western society, the authors have instead chosen to look at how the ancient Greeks perceived themselves and the world around them as well as how they reacted to that world. Each essay is signed by its authors, many of whom are internationally distinguished scholars, while the contributors' institutional affiliations are provided at the end of the book. Given the superb quality of the scholarship and the very reasonable price for a volume of this length, this book should be a priority purchase for both public and academic libraries.DTerry Skeats, Bishop's Univ. Lib., Lennoxville, Quebec (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

More colloquy than compendium, this remarkable volume shows scholars shining as teachers. Ingeniously, editors Brunschwig (emer., Univ. of Paris-II) and Lloyd (Univ. of Cambridge) have lured contributors into lively reflections, asking not just "How did the Greeks philosophize?" but "How did they conceive of their own philosophical practice?" This self-referential angle steers these historians, philosophers, and philologists away from linear review. Instead, readers encounter impassioned argument about the "invention of politics" and truthfulness in history--ideal for undergraduates seeking context for their study of primary texts. Entries spanning Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman philosophy, politics, and science (including a catalog on major thinkers and schools) presume fluency with Greek literature and history but do not overwhelm with scholarly debates--a risk for students sent unprepared to eventually indispensable, specialized texts such as Gregory Vlastos's two-volume Plato (1971). Specialists should not dismiss the collection, however, for it holds delights. Here is the opportunity to fill gaps in one's knowledge of Greek harmonics, divination, or Cynicism. Despite the volume's representation of contributing women scholars at a shamefully low 15 percent, this is an edition you should order immediately for your library. P. W. Wakefield; Trinity College (DC)


Table of Contents

Translators' Note
Introduction: On Home Ground in a Distant Land Maps Philosophy
The Philosopher Images of the World Myth and Knowledge
The Question of Being Epistemology Ethics Politics
The Statesman As Political Actor Inventing Politics Utopia and the Critique of Politics
The Sage and Politics
The Pursuit of Knowledge Schools and Sites of Learning Observation and Research
Demonstration and the Idea of Science Astronomy
Cosmology
Geography
Harmonics
History
Language
Logic
Mathematics
Medicine
Physics
Poetics
Rhetoric
Technology
Theology and Divination
Theories of Religion Major Figures Anaxagoras
Antisthenes
Archimedes
Aristotle
Democritus
Epicurus
Euclid
Galen
Heraclitus
Herodotus
Hippocrates
Parmenides
Plato
Plotinus
Plutarch
Polybius
Protagoras
Ptolemy
Pyrrhon
Socrates
Thucydides
Xenophon
Zeno Currents of Thought The Academy
Aristotelianism
Cynicism
Hellenism and Christianity
Hellenism and Judaism
The Milesians
Platonism
Pythagoreanism
Skepticism
Sophists
Stoicism
Chronology
Contributors
Illustration Sources
Index

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