Cover image for Nicky and the big, bad wolves
Title:
Nicky and the big, bad wolves
Author:
Gorbachev, Valeri.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : North-South Books, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Nicky the rabbit has a bad dream about being chased by lots of hungry wolves, but his mother has a solution to his distress.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 130 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.8 0.5 32784.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 21901 Guided reading level: J.
ISBN:
9781558589179

9781558589186
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clearfield Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

When Nicky the rabbit awakens from a nightmare, his mother is right there to cut his fears down to size. Valeri Gorbachev's adorable illustrations turn Nicky's scary night into a rollicking, reassuring bedtime book that is just right for restless sleepers. Full color.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 3-5. Nicky is a rabbit, and the big, bad wolves are the scary creatures who turn up in his dreams; in fact, there are a hundred wolves chasing him through a forest. "A hundred wolves?" asks his mother." Nicky concedes that there may have been only 50. But every time Nicky comes up with a new number, his mother questions him, until he gets it down to a manageable five. But by then, his brothers and sisters have wakened, and they're sure there are wolves right outside. Mama finally handles the situation by going outside with her trusty broom and yelling to the wolves to "get out of here." Now fully comforted, the bunnies are able to settle down--with a tired Mama asleep with them in the middle of the bed. This gets right to the heart of a child's worries and follows the logic of a child's mind. Consequently, not only will little ones see themselves here, but some of their nighttime anxieties may be relieved, as well. The pen-and-watercolor pictures are a delight, especially the wordless spreads that show the ever-diminishing numper of wolves still trying to wreak havoc. (Reviewed April 15, 1998)1558589171Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Scary dreams are the subject here‘a common theme, but Gorbachev (So Much in Common) enlivens it with particularly droll illustrations. Nicky is a very small bunny with a very big imagination, as he proves when he awakens one night from a bad dream. His mother rushes in, and the four siblings with whom he shares his bed hang on his every word as he recounts his nightmare. Gorbachev does not spread Nicky's fright to readers‘Nicky's dreams are relayed through a series of raffish pictures (e.g., a green-pajama-clad bunny alone in a small rowboat with a ship full of wolf-pirates bearing down on him; a bunny on foot, fleeing a gang of wolf-bikers in black leather). Mother Bunny is unimpressed ("A hundred wolves? Are you sure?"), and the air visibly leaks out of Nicky's fears ("Maybe it was fifty")‘but not before he's managed to petrify his brothers and sisters. Whether depicting the wolves in their many diverting incarnations, or five bunnies in bed, eyes squeezed tightly shut, mouths wide open as they holler for their mother, Gorbachev wrings every last ounce of humor from the action. The busy lines of the pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations whisk across the pages, underscoring the lighthearted mood that hums beneath the surface of both text and artwork‘even the wolves are more frolicsome than fierce. Invested with a fresh, friendly sensibility, this picture book will keep little ones coming back for more. Ages 4-7. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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