Cover image for Sly fox : a comedy in two acts adapted from "Volpone"
Title:
Sly fox : a comedy in two acts adapted from "Volpone"
Author:
Gelbart, Larry.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Revised & rewritten.
Publication Information:
New York : S. French, [1978]

©1978
Physical Description:
98 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780573615092
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3557.E368 S55 1978 Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

To tickle the humor of today's audiences, Volpone has been moved from 17th century Venice to turn of the century San Francisco. Volpone is now called Foxwell J. Sly and he is the same scheming, rapacious miser bent on extracting fortunes from a trio of rich, greedy opportunists. Sly, pretending to be on his death bed, says he will name each of the three as his sole heir. The extent that the trio will go to acquire Sly's fortune knows no bounds. One goes so far as to disinherit his only son; another offers up his wife to the lecherous Sly. Sly is aided and abetted by his conniving servant in grabbing the other men's gold.


Author Notes

Born in 1572, Ben Jonson rejected his father's bricklaying trade and ran away from his apprenticeship to join the army. He returned to England in 1592, working as an actor and playwright. In 1598, he was tried for murder after killing another actor in a duel, and was briefly imprisoned.

One of his first plays, Every Man Out of His Humor (1599) had fellow playwright William Shakespeare as a cast member. His success grew with such works as Volpone (1605) and The Alchemist (1610) and he was popular at court, frequently writing the Christmas masque. He is considered a very fine Elizabethan poet. In some anti-Stratfordian circles he is proposed as the true author of Shakespeare's plays, though this view is not widely accepted.

Jonson was appointed London historian in 1628, but that same year, his life took a downward turn. He suffered a paralyzing stroke and lost favor at court after an argument with architect Inigo Jones and the death of King James I.

Ben Jonson died on August 6, 1637.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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