Cover image for BodyChange : the 21-day fitness program for changing your body-- and changing your life!
Title:
BodyChange : the 21-day fitness program for changing your body-- and changing your life!
Author:
Williams, Montel.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Carlsbad, Calif. : Mountain Movers Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
xi, 129 pages : illustrations\. ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781588250049
Format :
Book

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Central Library GV481 .W555 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library GV481 .W555 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Award-winning talk show host Montel Williams has used the Bodychange programme to help him battle MS. In this book, Williams teams up with his personal trainer, Wini Linguvic, to teach others how to use this 21-day fitness programme.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One What Is the BodyChange Program? When Montel first told me that he wanted me to write a workout book with him, I was ecstatic. I'd wanted to put my program on paper for years, and the fact that Montel is my dream client made the situation perfect. The big hurdle, then, was to put into words the actions that Montel and I go through daily, almost as routinely as we breathe. Here goes.     The BodyChange program is a 21-day exercise routine that incorporates aerobics, weight training, and core and functional exercises to improve your balance, coordination, and strength. In the sport of life, we need these attributes to face the challenges that are put in front of us, whether these challenges come to us at the gym, at work, or at home. If you follow the program for 21 days, you will not only feel better and see improvements in your body tone and your mood, but you'll get in the habit of moving, working out, and feeling good--and that habit will become a hard one to break. Then you'll want to set a new 21-day goal to keep the momentum going.     The BodyChange program relies less on big, complex machines and more on free weights, a bench, and what I call core exercises . The program can be done just as effectively at home as in a gym. The aerobics and weight-training exercises are straightforward, and are discussed in detail in Part II of this book. But what about attitude? That's the motivation that many of us--even hard-core trainers--have to develop and sustain in order to make changes in our routines and in our lives. Attitude is what enables us to move mountains, whether that mountain is a concrete goal ("I want to really impress my former classmates at my upcoming 20th high school reunion") or a vague plan ("I would love to be more active this summer").     Montel and I hope that, in reading about our efforts to move the mountains on the road to keeping fit, you too will see that whatever excuse you have for not training--or not training harder--will be exposed for exactly what it is: an excuse. We hope that you'll be able to better deal with whatever is keeping you on the couch and off your feet--even if it's a chronic, debilitating illness--and that somewhere in these pages, you'll find the keys that unlock a new attitude. If we succeed in merely getting you to think about your life in a different way, we'll consider our efforts in writing this book to be a success. Beyond Maintenance     When was the last time you tested your limits? If you're like most people, it was probably when you took the physical fitness test in high school--or maybe that premed course in college. We tend to push ourselves early on, then kind of relax and forget how exhilarating improvement can be. Have you stretched yourself recently? I don't mean when you get up in the morning. What I mean is this: When was the last time you took on a truly challenging task at work, or sat down to have a difficult conversation `with your partner, or spoke up in the face of adversity for a cause you believe in? Do you remember the last time you moved past your comfort zone into unfamiliar territory? We get so used to doing the easy thing that we forget that putting ourselves out there--whether beginning an exercise routine or falling in love--is what it truly means to be alive.     Challenges come into our lives in all kinds of packages. Right now, cross your arms. Did you put your right arm on top of your left? Try switching. Did you find the movement a little uncomfortable? It might take a little extra effort to remember to do it that way next time. At the very least, it would require some awareness. The BodyChange program starts with awareness. You can't have change without awareness. What do you need to be aware of? First, that for the hour or so per day you engage in the exercise routine, you need to give it 100 percent of your attention. Second, you need to be aware that change can sometimes be uncomfortable. Third, you must believe that you have the power to change your body, and if you can change your body ... you can change your life. As Montel says, you can even move mountains. Training in Color     The core exercises of the BodyChange program nay look simple, but don't be deceived. If you stay 100 percent aware while you perform them, you'll begin to notice amazing results in your body. We all have moments of being truly aware--watching our children sleep peacefully, or breathing in the fresh air, for example. So try to attain that level of awareness when you're lifting the weights--really feel what you're doing. Don't think about anything but the movement you're doing and what your body feels like.     It's not as easy as it sounds, yet it becomes easier with practice. It requires that you stay in the moment, or, as the Zen expression says, "feel your feet in your shoes." I call it training in color . Training in color is feeling the exercise fully--knowing that your muscles are fatigued after ten reps, yet doing the two more reps you're not so confident about. Those two reps are the really important ones. Soon, those two extra reps that require extra effort will become easier.     But back to being in the moment. How often are we truly present in the moment? Why don't you try this simple exercise right now: Put this book down (only for a moment!), then close your eyes and feel your feet--not by touching them, but by thinking about how they feel. Feel your knees, your legs ... work your way up your body. Then consider this: What would it be like to feel your body while you're squeezing out those last two reps? If you're like me, probably a little uncomfortable. Awareness is demanding. While "feeling" your body in the above exercise, did you get distracted? Did your mind start to wander to the kids, the fridge, or the TV?     Here's an important question: At what point did you become distracted? Being aware of when you become distracted during an exercise is a good starting point for determining the kind of changes you need to make. I've noticed that being aware can be a real metaphor for life. Do you get distracted when something becomes difficult? If so, does that motivate you to try harder or to give up? Do you become distracted when something is too easy? If that's the case, do you get bored and disconnect, or do you look for ways to increase the challenge set before you? How do you avoid feelings of discomfort? Some people reach for a bag of cookies or a six-pack of beer. Others go shopping or gamble. How do you make life easier? Did you ever consider that staying with the discomfort--truly feeling it and not avoiding it--will, in the long run, make you stronger? Incorporating Change     Change--any kind of change--is uncomfortable, particularly as we get older. Many people I know are stuck in jobs they dislike because they're afraid of change. They would rather suffer their familiar discomfort than chart unknown waters. BodyChange teaches you how to be "comfortably uncomfortable." The program starts by saying, "You're stronger than you think." But to experience that strength, you've got to stretch beyond that feeling of comfort--what I call "training outside your comfort zone"--to test where your limits are and expand what feels comfortable to you. Once you do expand your comfort zone, you'll then begin to notice small but significant changes in your body, in your attitude, and in your life.     Part of the message of this book is don't underestimate yourself . One of Montel's mottos is: "There is nothing on this planet I cannot do." I once asked him if he was scared or uncomfortable the first time he spoke before an audience. His answer was amazing: "Absolutely. I still get anxious." So each time he has to appear, he sets his mind to it and works through the discomfort. If he hadn't confronted his fear of speaking before an audience, if he hadn't worked through his discomfort, he would never be where he is today.     In the gym, I teach my clients to seek out that point of discomfort, to embrace it as their next challenge. Where there's that sticking point, there's also an opportunity to get stronger.     If you're still uncomfortable about being uncomfortable, think about this: It really hurts more to stay in the same place, to not challenge yourself. If you don't believe me, then stop trying to improve. Stop trying to reach your potential. Tell me that doesn't hurt! Not meeting your potential has to be the most uncomfortable feeling of all.     Montel certainly understands this concept. In fact, he's written an entire book called Mountain, Get Out of My Way , about his efforts to deal with the challenges that he has confronted on his path, and later in these pages, he'll explain how that concept is not only related to being physically fit, but is utterly relevant to his entire life today. Believe in Yourself     Once you realize that you can change your body, you can move mountains. We've already established that you need to work at a 100 percent effort level, but most people dislike that kind of discomfort and intensity. BodyChange says that once you commit to working hard and accept being temporarily "comfortably uncomfortable," in 21 days you'll see definite changes in your body. And it goes a step further, because once you see changes in your body, you'll start to believe in yourself and find inner strength in other areas of your life as well.     Those feelings of strength and control will motivate you to continue using and adapting the BodyChange program. Montel comes to the gym every day because of the little accomplishments he achieves each time he's there. It's those little successes that motivate him to try harder on each successive day.     Don't get me wrong, failures can be motivating, too, but which feels better? While working out, you only have yourself to rely on. Even if you have the best trainer in the world, you still have to do the work yourself. There's no neighbor, friend, or therapist to help you through the drill--no ex-lover or boss to blame if you don't complete it. It's just you and the weights. But on the flip side, the accomplishments you achieve are all yours. You've earned them, and no one can take them away from you. You carry them with you throughout the day and throughout your life.     Montel and I find that control over our fate--even for that one hour in the gym most mornings--is very reassuring. We know that we're responsible for our own bodies--how they look and feel. Others may find this kind of control very daunting. It would be much easier to place the responsibility for our successes or failures (in the gym) on our parents (for their genes), on our partner (for keeping those cookies in the house), on our colleagues (for ordering pizza for lunch), or on our friends (for persuading us to go out for a few beers). But by giving away that responsibility, we're also giving away our power. Montel and I accept the responsibility and use our power to create and recreate ourselves. Trust me, there are days we slip, days that we go to the gym but we're just not up to the task. But we don't beat ourselves up about it. Instead, we remember our successes and how good it felt to follow the BodyChange program--and that's what gets us back on track.     The journey to fitness is a process, and it's an exciting experience to push yourself and find out what you're capable of. My clients love the results they get from their workouts. They come to the gym ready to work, and keep up with their programs because they enjoy pushing beyond their previous limits. There's no denying that the BodyChange program is a challenge, making not only physical demands but mental and emotional ones, too. But think of it this way: Won't it feel good to do something that truly challenges you, and effects change not only in your body, but in your mind and soul as well?     As you prepare to embark on the BodyChange program, you might find it helpful to understand why Montel and I decided to write this book. By seeing where we've come from in some detail and how we use the BodyChange program to achieve results, you'll see how this program can help you make significant changes in your own life. Copyright © 2001 Montel Williams and Wini Linguvic. All rights reserved.

Table of Contents

Montel Williams
Introductionp. ix
Part I The Program
Chapter 1 What Is the BodyChange Program?p. 3
Chapter 2 A Word from Montel: Mountain, Get Out of My Way!p. 9
Chapter 3 Wini's Storyp. 17
Chapter 4 The BodyChange Philosophyp. 21
Chapter 5 The BodyChange Program: Let's Get Started!p. 27
Chapter 6 The Importance of Functional Exercisep. 33
Chapter 7 Smart Aerobicsp. 37
Chapter 8 The Basicsp. 43
Part II The Exercises
Chapter 9 LowerBodyChangep. 49
Chapter 10 UpperBodyChange Chestp. 63
Chapter 11 UpperBodyChange Backp. 75
Chapter 12 UpperBodyChange Shouldersp. 81
Chapter 13 UpperBodyChange Tricepsp. 89
Chapter 14 UpperBodyChange Bicepsp. 95
Chapter 15 BodyChange Abdominalsp. 101
Chapter 16 Stretchingp. 111
Chapter 17 Designing Your Programp. 117
Chapter 18 Eating Smarter for Lifep. 121
Afterwordp. 127
About the Authorsp. 129

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