Cover image for Mouse of my heart : a treasury of sense and nonsense
Title:
Mouse of my heart : a treasury of sense and nonsense
Author:
Brown, Margaret Wise, 1910-1952.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, 2001.
Physical Description:
179 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
A collection of stories and poems, arranged in the categories "Adventure, " "Big and Little, " "Bravery, " "Love and Friendship, " "Happiness, " "Belonging, " "For a Rainy Day, " "Nonsense, " "Colors, " and "Nature."
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NP Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC K-2 2.8 5 Quiz: 25654 Guided reading level: L.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780786806287

9780786825462
Format :
Book

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Clarence Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eden Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenmore Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Niagara Branch Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Orchard Park Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A collection of stories and poems, arranged in the categories Adventure, Big and Little, Bravery, Love and Friendship, Happiness, Belonging, For a Rainy Day, Nonsense, Colors, and Nature.


Author Notes

Margaret Wise Brown was born on May 10, 1910 in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York, to Robert Brown, a Vice President at American Manufacturing Company and Maud Brown, a housewife. She attended school in Lausanne, Switzerland for three years, before attending Dana Hall in Wellesley, Massachusetts for two years. In 1928, she began taking classes at Hollis College in Virginia.

In 1935, Brown began working at the Bank Street Cooperative School for student teachers. Two years later, her writing career took off with the publication of "When the Wind Blows." Over the course of fourteen years, Brown wrote over one hundred picture books for children. Some of her best known titles include Goodnight Moon, Big Red Barn and Runaway Bunny.

Margaret Wise Brown died on November 13, 1952 of an embolism following an operation in Nice, France.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Mouse of My Heart: A Treasury of Sense and Nonsense gathers 56 poems and stories by Margaret Wise Brown, many previously unpublished. With an introduction by Leonard Marcus and jewel-like illustrations by Loretta Krupinski, this is one handsome volume. Whether celebrating contented solitude ("A Cottontail Rabbit in a Cotton Field") or the power of rebellion ("Sssssssssssssspit/ I'm Wild Cat Wild/ The Tiger's child"), Brown touches the universal feelings of childhood. ( Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-This fine collection brings together 56 of Brown's lesser-known or previously unpublished stories and poems. In his introduction, Leonard S. Marcus eloquently describes why Brown was one of the most sensitive writers for preschool children, but the actual poems and stories prove that she was ahead of her time. Organized loosely under 11 subject headings, the selections cover such diverse topics as "Adventure," "Nature," "Nonsense," and "Big and Little," all with an unerringly child-centered perspective. The pieces play with language, rhythm, and patterns ("Spoon up the moon" sings a bird in "Two Little Raccoons"). Brown's exquisite attention to detail (like the "bugs that laugh themselves awake" in "Song of Little Things") is echoed in Krupinski's excellent paintings that grace every page. Most entrancing, however, is the emotional truth demonstrated in such stories as "You Be Little and I'll Be Big," where all creatures, no matter what their size, can feel big or little, and sometimes need to have others take care of them. The bright, expressive illustrations focus mainly on animals and details of the natural world, and reflect the characters' emotions. Gentle humor is evident throughout, particularly in the opening illustration of "Belonging," which shows a mouse holding two sticks to his head like antennae, in an attempt to look like his two ladybug friends. Illustrations and text are an ideal match here. This is a beautiful book in every sense of the word, with much to treasure for children, adults, and scholars.-Kathleen Kelly MacMillan, Carroll County Public Library, Eldersburg, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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